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Spencer requests suspension lift

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first_imgPaul Greene, the attorney for 400m hurdler Kaliese Spencer, yesterday requested that the provisional suspension against the athlete for an anti-doping rule violation be lifted, pending the outcome of a hearing before the Jamaica Anti-Doping Disciplinary Panel scheduled for May 15. Spencer, dressed in slate-grey pants suit, blue ruffled blouse and blue pumps, was the picture of composure and smiled amiably with those present at yesterday’s preliminary hearing at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston, where she was also accompanied by her agent, Marvin Anderson. Greene made the argument that there was a only short period of time before the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) National Senior Championships begins on June 22, and that a provisional suspension was merely optional as Spencer did not test positive for a prohibited substance. He requested that the panel, chaired by Kent Gammon and including Heron Dale and Donovan Calder, consider lifting the suspension. “We’re concerned about timing, and JADCO, in the past, has taken too long under the rules to have a hearing. Miss Spencer is an IAAF international-level athlete and those rules require a hearing within two months, which the panel clearly understood,” he told the media afterwards. Greene also noted that the hearing to suspend Spencer should have been made before the panel instead of privately before the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission’s Executive Director, Carey Brown. “And they didn’t provide any evidence at the provisional suspension hearing… and for those reasons, we believe the suspension should be lifted,” he added. “I’m very surprised that they didn’t provide any evidence at the provisional suspension hearing. How do you decide to put an optional provisional suspension in place without presenting any evidence that she should be suspended? I’m not surprised, because I’ve dealt with JADCO in the past; but I am surprised in general that it happened that way,” Greene said. The Gleaner posed that question of why a hearing was done privately to Carey Brown, who said he could not answer because he was rushing off to another engagement. Lackston Robinson, who also represented JADCO at the hearing, said his body had no objections to the lifting of a suspension. Gammon, meanwhile, said that the panel would consider the request with the decision to be communicated within a week. The hearing is scheduled to begin on May 15 at 11 a.m. JADCO was given until April to submit their brief and bundle of documents, including witness statements, while Greene said he would respond by April 28. Greene added that if the outcome was not in Spencer’s favour, her defence team could pursue the option of going directly to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland to ask for provisional relief. “Our biggest concern is timing. If we can get a decision by June 1, let’s assume she loses, we can then go to CAS and ask for provisional relief and then she compete in the trials. If we can show irreparable harm and likelihood of success, which we will be able to show, she then can compete pending the outcome of the CAS case because if she wins and she didn’t compete at trials, she can’t go to Worlds (Championships),” he explained. NO OBJECTIONlast_img read more

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Man United reportedly considering Premier League goalkeeper to replace De Gea

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first_img REVEALED However, he may yet resist signing a fresh deal, meaning United would have the option of selling him in one of the next three transfer windows, or risk losing him for free.The Sun claim Jose Mourinho’s men are preparing for every eventuality, and have earmarked Mat Ryan as a possible target in case the worst happens and they lose the Spaniard. targets 2 deals 26-year-old Ryan joined Brighton from Valencia at the beginning of last season and played a key role in their first Premier League season.The Australian helped the side secure safety last season, with the decisive result coming in the form of a 1-0 win over Manchester United, the side he could now join. Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? 2 Matic one of two players for sale with ‘two Premier League clubs’ interested What every Premier League club’s fans dream of this Christmas Latest Manchester United News FAREWELL REVEALED center_img BIG PRESENTS UP TOP boost gameday cracker Mat Ryan moved to the Premier League from LaLiga RANKED IN DEMAND Solskjaer gives Pogba fitness update and calls him world’s best all-round midfielder Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Manchester United are eyeing Brighton goalkeeper Mat Ryan as a potential replacement for David de Gea, according to reports.The Red Devils are understood to have activated an option on their current number one’s contract which will keep him at the club until the end of next season. Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland David de Gea has been named Manchester United’s ‘Player of the Season’ four times in the last five years last_img read more

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TRUCK FEST COMES TO DONEGAL – PICTURE SPECIAL

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first_imgTRUCK FEST COMES TO DONEGAL – PICTURE SPECIAL was last modified: August 26th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:clanree hotelletterkennyTruck Festlast_img

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Quotes from the Latin Grammys

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first_imgBest Latin Jazz Album, Bebo Valdes: “If God wills it … I want to keep making music until I die.” Best Tejano Album, “Polkas, Gritos Y Acordeones” Sunny Sauceda: “Being able to win a Grammy and now a Latin Grammy, this is definitely a life altering experience.” A teary Laura Pausini, expressing surprise at winning for Best Female Pop Vocal Album: “I don’t know what to say because I thought Bebe was going to win to tell you the truth.” Argentina’s 10-time Grammy winner Gustavo Santaolalla after winning for Producer of the Year: “For me, this Grammy is very special … because it was the producer of the year. It’s one of the parts that occupy my life most.” On the Latin Grammys move to the Spanish-language network Univision: “I think it’s an interesting step for the show since it is a Latin show and it is about Latin music. I hope people from the Anglo world also tap into it because as you know, music is a universal language.” Latin alt-rocker Julieta Venegas on performing on stage with the long-running norteno band Los Tigres del Norte: “It’s an honor,” she gushed. “I’ve listened to them all my life and now to know them, it’s a dream.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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No official bid for defender – agent

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first_imgParis St-Germain have made no official offer to Chelsea for transfer-listed defender Alex, according to his agent.Alex is widely tipped to link up with former Blues boss Carlo Ancelotti at the French club and is keen to make the move, having turned down QPR.But his representative, Giuliano Bertolucci, told L’Equipe: “We didn’t receive any official offer from PSG.“At the current stage, it is only talks, but they have started well. Alex has a big desire to join PSG.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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The Blind Men and the Ape Man

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first_img“We have all seen the canonical parade of apes, each one becoming more human. We know that, as a depiction of evolution, this line-up is tosh. Yet we cling to it. Ideas of what human evolution ought to have been like still colour our debates.”  So said Henry Gee, editor of Nature this month (478, 6 October 2011, page 34, doi:10.1038/478034a),  Are other icons coloring scientists’ views of human origins?  How close are they to describing scientifically where we come from? Debates over microevolution:  In PNAS this month, Milot et al. (October 3, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1104210108) claim to have found evidence of microevolution in a modern human population.  The first line of their abstract indicates that another debate rages among secular anthropologists.  “It is often claimed that modern humans have stopped evolving because cultural and technological advancements have annihilated natural selection. In contrast, recent studies show that selection can be strong in contemporary populations. However, detecting a response to selection is particularly challenging,” they said.  What they claimed to find is a change in age of first reproduction in French Canadian women over the last 140 years.  This begs the question whether cultural changes can also contribute to genetic changes.  Their last line indicates that they realize other causes than natural selection may be responsible: “Our results show that microevolution can be detectable over relatively few generations in humans and underscore the need for studies of human demography and reproductive ecology to consider the role of evolutionary processes.”  Debates over Homo:  Fred Spoor, weighing in on the recent Australopithecus sediba controversy in Nature (478, 06 October 2011, pp. 44–45, doi:10.1038/478044a), mentioned “debate” several times: (1) Berger’s fossils “open up a debate about the origins of the genus Homo,” (2) Berger’s “idea that no fossil older than 2.0 Myr is legitimately attributable to Homo is highly debatable — the arguments provided in the paper are insufficiently specific to be conclusive,” Spoor said; (3) “The interpretation of their findings may be a matter of debate,” he ended.  He never quite clarified the breadth of the debate. Sugar man:  The new icon of human evolution may have to include a member eating a candy bar.  “‘Sugary’ Mutation May Have Led to Humans’ Rise,” announced Science Daily.  A look into the article reveals a completely different claim, however.  A loss mutation in the ability to produce a certain sugar, scientists at UC San Diego claim, helped early hominids diverge from great apes.  From then on, did the lineup of human evolution occur that Henry Gee described as tosh? Start over:  “It’s impossible to pinpoint the moment when a paradigm shifts. But when it comes to views of the origin of Homo sapiens, last month may be as good a time as any,” wrote Ann Gibbons in Science this month (14 October 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6053 p. 167, doi:10.1126/science.334.6053.167).  She was speaking of the revolutionary claim that Denisovans and Neanderthals appear to have interbred with modern humans.  She quotes Chris Stringer saying, “Africa doesn’t have a simple story of modern humans appearing and everything else disappearing.”  That marks “a turning point in views of modern human origins,” Gibbons demonstrated with other expert opinions: “‘Indeed, “if interbreeding happened outside of Africa,’ as the complete genomes of Neandertals and Denisovans suggest, ‘it is quite likely it also happened within Africa,’ says population geneticist Laurent Excoffier of the University of Bern in Switzerland.”  Interbreeding is a sign all these varieties of humans were members of a single species. He was what he ate:  A headline on Science Daily reads,“New Technologies Challenge Old Ideas About Early Hominid Diets.”  Surprise: Nutcracker Man didn’t crack nuts.  That’s not all:  “New assessments by researchers using the latest high-tech tools to study the diets of early hominids are challenging long-held assumptions about what our ancestors ate,” if indeed the ape-like creatures Paranthropus boisei were ancestral to humans.  “….Such findings are forcing anthropologists to rethink long-held assumptions about early hominids,” it continued, raising questions about what long-held assumptions today are immune from radical rethinking.  How radical?  Matt Sponheimer  from the University of Colorado said, “It is also clear that our previous notions of this group’s diet were grossly oversimplified at best, and absolutely backward at worst…. The bottom line is that our old answers about hominid diets are no longer sufficient, and we really need to start looking in directions that would have been considered crazy even a decade ago.”  He did not consider whether the notion that these creatures are ancestral to humans might someday be considered backward or crazy.  Given their own words, such upsets appear conceivable. Ochre on the half shell:  Live Science has a photo of an abalone shell that appears to have been used like a mortar and pestle for working some reddish compound long, long ago. “The mixture may have been used as a paint or adhesive,” the caption reads, indicating the cosmetics industry got an early start at 100,000 years ago.  “It’s the oldest evidence of humans making a complex compound, and even the oldest evidence of humans using containers.”  Found in Blombos Cave, South Africa, the shells show presence of toolkits for working materials.  “No matter what the use of the compound, Henshilwood and Wadley agree that its existence reveals that our ancient ancestors were a clever bunch,” the article ended.  “The hunter-gatherers knew what to collect to make the paint, and they transported the ocher from 12 miles (20 km) away, suggesting smart planning.”  Now hear this: “In fact, Henshilwood said, the oil-pigment-and-binders mixture they created was almost the same as paint recipes used in ancient Egypt only a few thousand years ago.”  Imagine that; no improvement in this technology for 95,000 years – by a clever bunch. Teacher influence:  In a video interview on Live Science, Curtis Maren describes how he was inspired to become a paleoanthropologist by old black-and-white films of Louis and Mary Leakey looking for human origins in Africa (little of whose views remain intact).  Maren now looks for evidence of the evolution of human brain power in Greece.  “In 2007, Marean and a team of researchers reported finding evidence at Pinnacle Point that suggests humans may have eaten seafood more than 40,000 years earlier than previous estimates and it may have been a catalyst for early human migration out of Africa,” the article said.  “In 2009, Marean and colleagues reported finding evidence from this location that early modern humans used fire in a controlled way to increase the quality and efficiency of stone tools, possibly a sign of the evolution of human brain power.”  Claiming that science is self-correcting (see previous entry), and that his methods are equivalent to those of physicists who do rocket science, Marean claims that paleoanthropologists need to have a high value of ethics, does not explain how ethics evolved.  He does, however, underscore several paradigm shifts he is aware of.  Now Marean, a hard rock devotee, influences young people himself. Cave men discovered:  According to PhysOrg, five living cave men have emerged from a cave in Sardinia.  They were astronauts from the ESA (European Space Agency), undergoing a test of isolation from familiar day-night cycles for six days.  As scientists, they demonstrated that human intelligence is not necessarily correlated with habitat. Reading the stuff that evolutionary paleoanthropologists crank out is both entertaining and exasperating.  They are like the blind men and the elephant, taking their partial evidence and weaving grand tales (or tails) out of them.  One of the major icons of evolution, the line-up of human evolution from dancing ape to Man the Wise, was described by Henry Gee as tosh.  Tosh means bosh.  Bosh means nonsense.  That means that for decades, school children were taught nonsense, bosh, tosh.  Omigosh, they were awash in bosh, learning tosh with panache.  Do you have any confidence, dear reader, that these blind men called paleoanthropologists, so self-admittedly clueless and subject to crazy paradigm shifts, are capable of coming up with a unified theory of elephant?(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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UK regional Flybe spreads its European wings

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first_imgBrexit and other uncertainties are not stopping UK regional carrier Flybe from planning an ambitious expansion that takes it beyond Britain and into continental Europe.In August this year, Flybe launched its first two routes not touching its home market:  from Hanover in northern Germany to both Lyon, in France, and Italy’s Milan-Malpensa.It is not planning to replicate the 15 per cent capacity expansion seen in the past financial year but is looking at an increase of 6 per cent. By March next year, it’s fleet will consist of 85 aircraft, 11 more than a year earlier, with 60 Q400s among them.But Flybe hasn’t lowered its ambitions by any means.“We have a desire to be European”, says chief revenue officer Vincent Hodder.  “And there is no better time than now to start this journey into the future.“You have to distinguish between a short-term uncertainty and the long-term success of the Flybe business model.”Hodder says there are currently about 13 million passengers travelling on routes not served by low-cost carriers or with very limited competition on them.“We are a regional airline flying underneath the radar of LCCs, which is a great opportunity,’’ he adds.On a whopping 80 per cent of its 218 routes, serving 75 destinations in ten countries, Flybe flies without any competition.  It faces competition from easyJet on just 10 routesFlybe’s big advantage here is its efficient fleet of  Q400s and it will have 54 at year-end.   The regional carrier is the second biggest operator of the turboprop worldwide and, with just 78 seats, the aircraft enable it to operate a route profitably if it yields 40,000 passengers annually.By contrast, easyJet needs at least 100,000 paying customers per year to profitably operate a route with an Airbus A319.Flybe  estimates 39 million people in Western Europe are currently underserved with regional connectivity.“If we could carry just 10 per cent of that, we could double in size”, calculates Hodder.While this bold vision could be acutely threatened by Brexit, Hodder insists: “I don’t think Brexit will force us to give up such routes as Hanover to Lyon. We will always find ways to get around restrictions that might be imposed by governments. One of our great advantages is to be flexible and adapt to change, and very quickly.”A major focus for Flybe currently is on Germany, where it an expanded offering will see Düsseldorf become Flybe’s first base outside the UK by fall 2017.“We plan to station initially three Q400s there and hire German crews for cockpit and cabin”, says chief operations officer Luke Farajallah.Another aspect of Flybe’s success is its ability to combine elements of both network carriers and LCCs.  It operates  a decentralised route network means it operates from 10 bases in addition to its corporate headquarters in the southern English city of Exeter.The biggest base is Birmingham, where currently 11 of its total fleet of 76 aircraft are stationed, followed by Southampton, with nine aircraft, and Belfast with eight.It serves 40 regional airports in the UK and boasts by far the densest domestic network.“One of two passengers flying within the UK without touching London is a Flybe customer”, says Hodder. “We are operating 53 per cent of all domestic flights within the main British isle.”The airline was founded in 1979 as Jersey European Airlines but became British European from 2000 before adopting its current name in 2002.It came close to bankruptcy in  2014 but chief executive Saad Hammad, who arrived in 2013, succeeded in turning around the company and returning it to profit in 2015-16.In the first half of 2016-17, however, profits halved and in October, Hammad unexpectedly resigned without giving reasons.The departure came as British airlines face an uncertain future with little clarity about the ramifications of Brexit and what traffic rights they will have to the continent, and within the European Union.At the same time, the pound weakened and lacklustre passenger demand and overcapacities in the European short haul markets further worsened the outlook.During the first half of 2016-17, Flybe’s capacity increased 13.5 per cent while actual passenger numbers only rose by about 7 per cent, prompting load factors to fall to 72 per cent.“We have an offering of frequencies and density in our schedules equal to a network airline, and a cost base like an LCC,’’ says Hodder. “We sell 80 per cent of our tickets via our website, another LCC element.“At the same time, more like a network carrier, we are working a lot with codeshare agreements and interlining, with Air France, Etihad, Emirates or Virgin Atlantic, in Europe also with Air Berlin now.’’last_img read more

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London pays tribute to Nelson Mandela

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first_img4 March 2014 Nelson Mandela “represented the possibility of a better human society, not only in South Africa but in the world at large,” South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe told the nearly 2 000 people that filled London’s Westminster Abbey on Monday for a special service celebrating Mandela’s life. Nelson Mandela, who passed away in December aged 95, joined a select group of non-Britons – including former Botswana President Seretse Khama, Jamaican Prime Minister Alexander Bustamente and Australian Prime Minister Robert Menzies – who have been honoured by a service of thanksgiving at the 1000-year-old church where Britain crowns and buries its kings and queens. The guests at Monday’s service included Prince Harry, representing the Queen, British Prime Minister David Cameron, former prime ministers John Major and Gordon Brown, members of the Mandela family, and actor Idris Elba, who played Mandela in the film Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.Thanks ‘for a truly great man’ Dean of Westminster John Hall, conducting the service, reminded the guests that a thanksgiving service for South Africa was held in the Abbey 20 years ago to celebrate the country’s first democratic elections. “At that time, all who were here, and people throughout the world, thanked God for the triumph of a spirit of reconciliation, and for peaceful transition,” Hall said. “It is hard to imagine that any of this would have been possible without the grace and generosity shown by Nelson Mandela. “Today we join together, representing the people of South Africa, of the United Kingdom, and of the Commonwealth, to give thanks to almighty God for a truly great man.” Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, in his address, thanked anti-apartheid campaigners in UK for their support during the years of apartheid rule. “Thank you to the elegant ladies who boycotted South African oranges,” said Archbishop Tutu. “Thank you to those who followed a long-haired Peter Hain [the British Labour Party politician who was a noted anti-apartheid campaigner in the 1970s].” Hain, who also addressed the congregation, said that Mandela never forgot the tens of thousands of British citizens who supported South Africa’s struggle, adding that he would have been humbled by Monday’s service.‘History will judge us in light of Mandela’ President Motlanthe said that Mandela had been shaped by his country’s struggle, “which shunned confrontation but held values of compassion and solidarity that went beyond simple opposition to apartheid”, and that his inheritors were now faced with the challenge of making his dream come to pass. “Humanity must consciously strive to free political activity, democracy, and the right to differ without the prospect of imprisonment, torture and assassination,” Motlanthe said. “The most enduring monument we can build to Mandela’s memory is to strive for human solidarity, to conquer racism and sexism, to eradicate social inequalities, educate the masses, make health accessible to all, and uphold a human rights culture. “Posterity will look at the current generation in the light of the Mandela experience. If we fail it will not make sense to future generations that while Mandela evolved into a rugged moral force that edged humanity higher on the plane of civilisation, those who followed him either failed to live up to his philosophy or simply destroyed his dream.” Westminster Abbey announced on Sunday that it would be honouring Mandela with a memorial ledger stone, to be unveiled later this year. Mandela was welcomed to the Abbey in July 1996 when, during a state visit as president of South Africa, he laid a wreath at the Grave of the Unknown Warrior. South African President Jacob Zuma, who was unable to attend Monday’s service due to work commitments, issued a statement on Sunday thanking the British government and people and the Abbey in particular for hosting the memorial service.
 He said South Africa was humbled by the gesture, “which demonstrates yet again the impact of Madiba in the world. “This service demonstrates how this global icon that is Madiba touched many lives and hearts and was able to transcend geographical boundaries in spreading messages of peace, unity and the need for a better world.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Crop insurance company returns declining

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Private crop insurance company returns have decreased significantly since the 2010 renegotiation of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA) between the insurance companies and the federal government, and are in line with benchmarks established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency, according to a new study released today by the National Corn Growers Association.“The federal crop insurance program is the cornerstone of farm bill risk management programs, and it is more important than ever given the state of the farm economy,” said Steve Ebke, chairman of the NCGA Risk Management Action Team and a farmer from Daykin, Nebraska. “We commissioned an independent analysis of the crop insurance industry’s performanceto determine whether criticisms against the insurers’ returns have merit. What we discovered is that the returns private crop insurance companies receive are much smaller than opponents claim, and they are well within the standards set by RMA.”According to the findings, from 1998 to 2010, crop insurance companies had an average net return on retained premium of 14.1%. From 2011 to 2015, returns averaged 1.5%, a decrease of 12.6 percentage points.Private crop insurance companies are part of a public-private partnership for delivering federal crop insurance to American farmers. Crop insurance companies are responsible for delivering policies to farmers and managing the claims adjustment process. Crop insurance companies bear a portion of the risks associated with crop insurance policies. In return for these services, companies receive compensation in the form of Administrative and Operating (A&O) reimbursements and underwriting gains.The SRA establishes the levels of compensation for the companies. The 2010 renegotiations substantially cut A&O reimbursements and limited the share of underwriting gains that crop insurance companies could receive. As a result, net returns to retained premiums are expected to average approximately 5.7 percentage points lower compared to pre-2010 levels.The study was commissioned by NCGA and conducted by Gary Schnitkey, professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois; Joshua Woodard, assistant professor and the Zaitz Family Faculty Fellow of Agricultural Business and Finance at Cornell University; and Bruce Sherrick, professor of agricultural and consumer economics and Director of the TIAA-CREF Center for Farmland Research at the University of Illinois.last_img read more

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Assam MLA carries, cremates body of poor man

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first_imgDilip Dey had only a physically challenged cousin to call family. So when he died in his hometown Mariani on Thursday, there weren’t enough people to carry his body to the crematorium.Mariani, in Assam’s Jorhat district, is about 320 km east of Guwahati.Local Congress MLA Rupjyoti Kurmi, 40, stepped in to be one of the pallbearers as well as cremate Mr. Dey’s body.“He was too poor and lonely to have a decent funeral. As a human being and responsible for the people I represent, it was the least I could do for him,” Mr. Kurmi told The Hindu.Mr. Dey, who was in his mid-50s, lived in the Deberapar Chariali locality of Mariani. Rupom Gogoi, a trader in the neighbourhood, came to know about his death and informed Mr. Kurmi.“He lost no time in helping prepare the chita (stretcher-like bamboo structure on which a body is taken to the crematorium) and carry the body for cremation,” Mr. Gogoi said.Locals said Mr. Kurmi, a three-time MLA from Mariani constituency has had a history of humanitarian service – at times in situation considered too dangerous for VIPs, thus earning him the ‘quirky’ tag.Do-gooderIn July 2017, he hoisted a bag of 50 kg rice on his back and delivered it to a flood relief camp near Kaziranga National Park.On Friday evening, less than 24 hours after ensuring Mr. Dey’s cremation, the MLA became a pallbearer for the janaza (funeral) of a local auto-rickshaw driver’s mother.Kabir Ahmed, the auto-rickshaw driver, had wanted the MLA to be part of his mother’s final journey.Mr. Kurmi won his first Assembly election from Mariani in 2006. The seat had earlier been represented by his mother Rupam Kurmi, who was the first woman graduate among Adivasis in Assam.The Adivasis are often called ‘tea tribes’ though they do not enjoy the Scheduled Tribe status.last_img read more

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