上海千花网,爱上海,上海419论坛 – Powered by Gregary Thayne!

Who Is CBL’s New Governor Designate?

Posted on by

first_imgNathaniel Patray, Executive Governor, Central Bank of LiberiaFollowing the resignation of former Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) Executive Governor, Milton A. Weeks, President George Weah on July 4, nominated a long-time financial expert, Nathaniel R. Patray as the new Governor.Patray comes to the CBL with over 27 years post graduate experience in economics, banking, and finance relevant to developing countries.Patray, 68, completed his secondary education at the College of West Africa (CWA) on Ashumn Street in 1970, and later enrolled at the Wayne County Community College, Detroit, Michigan, USA, where he obtained an Associate Degree (AA) in Business Administration.A year later, he earned a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Degree in Industrial Management from Detroit Institute of Technology, (now Lawrence Institute of Technology), USA; and holds a Master Degree in Economics from the University of Detroit, Michigan, in 1977.He underwent training at several financial institutions including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), USA, International Bank for Reconstruction and Redevelopment (World Bank), Federal Reserve Bank, USA, African Development Bank (AfDB), Ivory Coast and the African Center for Monetary Studies (ACMS), Senegal.While at the National Bank of Liberia now CBL, Mr. Patray served in various capacities including Economist, Manager for Research Department, Deputy Governor, and Senior Executive Officer for Research, Policy, and Planning.At the CBL, Patray served as Senior Executive Officer for Administration, working directly with the Executive Governor and Deputy Governor in administering the work of the various departments by assisting them in formulating administrative, monetary and financial policies in the context of the macro-economy and appropriate implementation to ensure exchange rate stability and, by extension, price stability in order to bring about economic growth and development in the country.In 1998 to 1999, the new Governor-designate also served as chairman of the CBL committee on the exchange of the “Liberty” Banknotes to the different denominations of banknotes being used in the 15 counties.Mr. Patray in 1995 also served chairman, Workshop on the “Rural Financing under Structural Adjustment Program” held under the auspices of the African Rural and Agriculture Credit Association (AFRACA), in collaboration with the National Bank of Liberia and the Central Bank of Gambia in Banjul.The new CBL Executive Governor served as chairman AIESEC, Liberia, a global theme symposium “Where is Corporate Liberia?” A question for Liberia’s economic recovery in 1992.Also in 1989, Patray was appointed as the first vice-president on the technical committee for the establishment of a Monetary Union within the Mano River Union between Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.Governor-designate Patray served as coordinator of the West African Clearing House Annual meeting in Liberia in 1986; he also served as editor of SportsNews, local and foreign sports news outlet published by the Monrovia/Pistons Sports Association, Inc.He retired from the CBL in 2005, and after his retirement, he was later hired by the CBL as a consultant to provide technical input and to help prepare its first Operational Manual in collaboration with an IMF Advisor, Executive Directors, and Managers of the Bank.Mr. Patray taught Economics at the University of Liberia (UL) from 1978 to 1986. While at the UL, he joined the Don Bosco Polytechnic (now Stella Maris Polytechnic) as Part-time Instructor with the Arthur Barclay Business College, teaching Economic Principles (ECON:201 and 202) and have served for more than 20 years. For the past four semesters, he has been teaching Intermediate Microeconomics (304).He also joined the faculty of the Cuttington University Graduate School and Professional Studies (CUGS) in 2012 as Part-time Lecturer with the School of Business and Public Administration. Currently, he is serving as Full-time Lecturer teaching Investments (FINC: 660-01), Macroeconomic Theory one (ECON: 612-1), and Money and Banking (FINC: 662-01).On September 19, 2015, Mr. Patray received a Certificate of Appreciation from Dr. Henrique F. Tokpa, former president of Cuttington University, in recognition of valuable contribution to the University over the years.Mr. Patray authored several publications including, the Role of Government in Monetary Management (The Case of Liberia), presented in Lomé, Togo and published by the African Center for Monetary Studies, “Monetary Management in Africa”; The Growth of Private and Official Debt (The Case of Liberia) presented in Tunis, Tunisia and published by the African Center for Monetary Studies, “External Debt Problems of African Countries in the 1980”; Liberia’s Balance of Payment 1970-1980; Policy Measures Adopted by the National Bank of Liberia during 1994 and through the 1st and 2nd Quarters of 1995, published in the National Bank of Liberia Review/Volume 3, No. 5 and 6; and Inflationary pressures in Liberia: Do you Understand Why? Published in the National Bank of Liberia Topical Paper/Volume 2, No.1, 1991.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

49ers draft: Why picking a defensive end is safe, obvious call

Posted on by

first_imgSANTA CLARA – It’s almost too simple what the 49ers will do with the No. 2 overall pick Thursday.This is a draft rich with defensive linemen. Upgrading that unit remains a priority for the 49ers. They could have their pick of the litter.“It could be Quinnen Williams, Nick Bosa, Josh Allen – all those guys can pass rush,” 49ers defensive tackle DeForest Buckner said. “The more pass rush you have on the D-line, the better.”San Francisco 49ers defensive lineman DeForest Buckner talks to the …last_img

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , .

The Blind Men and the Ape Man

Posted on by

first_img“We have all seen the canonical parade of apes, each one becoming more human. We know that, as a depiction of evolution, this line-up is tosh. Yet we cling to it. Ideas of what human evolution ought to have been like still colour our debates.”  So said Henry Gee, editor of Nature this month (478, 6 October 2011, page 34, doi:10.1038/478034a),  Are other icons coloring scientists’ views of human origins?  How close are they to describing scientifically where we come from? Debates over microevolution:  In PNAS this month, Milot et al. (October 3, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1104210108) claim to have found evidence of microevolution in a modern human population.  The first line of their abstract indicates that another debate rages among secular anthropologists.  “It is often claimed that modern humans have stopped evolving because cultural and technological advancements have annihilated natural selection. In contrast, recent studies show that selection can be strong in contemporary populations. However, detecting a response to selection is particularly challenging,” they said.  What they claimed to find is a change in age of first reproduction in French Canadian women over the last 140 years.  This begs the question whether cultural changes can also contribute to genetic changes.  Their last line indicates that they realize other causes than natural selection may be responsible: “Our results show that microevolution can be detectable over relatively few generations in humans and underscore the need for studies of human demography and reproductive ecology to consider the role of evolutionary processes.”  Debates over Homo:  Fred Spoor, weighing in on the recent Australopithecus sediba controversy in Nature (478, 06 October 2011, pp. 44–45, doi:10.1038/478044a), mentioned “debate” several times: (1) Berger’s fossils “open up a debate about the origins of the genus Homo,” (2) Berger’s “idea that no fossil older than 2.0 Myr is legitimately attributable to Homo is highly debatable — the arguments provided in the paper are insufficiently specific to be conclusive,” Spoor said; (3) “The interpretation of their findings may be a matter of debate,” he ended.  He never quite clarified the breadth of the debate. Sugar man:  The new icon of human evolution may have to include a member eating a candy bar.  “‘Sugary’ Mutation May Have Led to Humans’ Rise,” announced Science Daily.  A look into the article reveals a completely different claim, however.  A loss mutation in the ability to produce a certain sugar, scientists at UC San Diego claim, helped early hominids diverge from great apes.  From then on, did the lineup of human evolution occur that Henry Gee described as tosh? Start over:  “It’s impossible to pinpoint the moment when a paradigm shifts. But when it comes to views of the origin of Homo sapiens, last month may be as good a time as any,” wrote Ann Gibbons in Science this month (14 October 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6053 p. 167, doi:10.1126/science.334.6053.167).  She was speaking of the revolutionary claim that Denisovans and Neanderthals appear to have interbred with modern humans.  She quotes Chris Stringer saying, “Africa doesn’t have a simple story of modern humans appearing and everything else disappearing.”  That marks “a turning point in views of modern human origins,” Gibbons demonstrated with other expert opinions: “‘Indeed, “if interbreeding happened outside of Africa,’ as the complete genomes of Neandertals and Denisovans suggest, ‘it is quite likely it also happened within Africa,’ says population geneticist Laurent Excoffier of the University of Bern in Switzerland.”  Interbreeding is a sign all these varieties of humans were members of a single species. He was what he ate:  A headline on Science Daily reads,“New Technologies Challenge Old Ideas About Early Hominid Diets.”  Surprise: Nutcracker Man didn’t crack nuts.  That’s not all:  “New assessments by researchers using the latest high-tech tools to study the diets of early hominids are challenging long-held assumptions about what our ancestors ate,” if indeed the ape-like creatures Paranthropus boisei were ancestral to humans.  “….Such findings are forcing anthropologists to rethink long-held assumptions about early hominids,” it continued, raising questions about what long-held assumptions today are immune from radical rethinking.  How radical?  Matt Sponheimer  from the University of Colorado said, “It is also clear that our previous notions of this group’s diet were grossly oversimplified at best, and absolutely backward at worst…. The bottom line is that our old answers about hominid diets are no longer sufficient, and we really need to start looking in directions that would have been considered crazy even a decade ago.”  He did not consider whether the notion that these creatures are ancestral to humans might someday be considered backward or crazy.  Given their own words, such upsets appear conceivable. Ochre on the half shell:  Live Science has a photo of an abalone shell that appears to have been used like a mortar and pestle for working some reddish compound long, long ago. “The mixture may have been used as a paint or adhesive,” the caption reads, indicating the cosmetics industry got an early start at 100,000 years ago.  “It’s the oldest evidence of humans making a complex compound, and even the oldest evidence of humans using containers.”  Found in Blombos Cave, South Africa, the shells show presence of toolkits for working materials.  “No matter what the use of the compound, Henshilwood and Wadley agree that its existence reveals that our ancient ancestors were a clever bunch,” the article ended.  “The hunter-gatherers knew what to collect to make the paint, and they transported the ocher from 12 miles (20 km) away, suggesting smart planning.”  Now hear this: “In fact, Henshilwood said, the oil-pigment-and-binders mixture they created was almost the same as paint recipes used in ancient Egypt only a few thousand years ago.”  Imagine that; no improvement in this technology for 95,000 years – by a clever bunch. Teacher influence:  In a video interview on Live Science, Curtis Maren describes how he was inspired to become a paleoanthropologist by old black-and-white films of Louis and Mary Leakey looking for human origins in Africa (little of whose views remain intact).  Maren now looks for evidence of the evolution of human brain power in Greece.  “In 2007, Marean and a team of researchers reported finding evidence at Pinnacle Point that suggests humans may have eaten seafood more than 40,000 years earlier than previous estimates and it may have been a catalyst for early human migration out of Africa,” the article said.  “In 2009, Marean and colleagues reported finding evidence from this location that early modern humans used fire in a controlled way to increase the quality and efficiency of stone tools, possibly a sign of the evolution of human brain power.”  Claiming that science is self-correcting (see previous entry), and that his methods are equivalent to those of physicists who do rocket science, Marean claims that paleoanthropologists need to have a high value of ethics, does not explain how ethics evolved.  He does, however, underscore several paradigm shifts he is aware of.  Now Marean, a hard rock devotee, influences young people himself. Cave men discovered:  According to PhysOrg, five living cave men have emerged from a cave in Sardinia.  They were astronauts from the ESA (European Space Agency), undergoing a test of isolation from familiar day-night cycles for six days.  As scientists, they demonstrated that human intelligence is not necessarily correlated with habitat. Reading the stuff that evolutionary paleoanthropologists crank out is both entertaining and exasperating.  They are like the blind men and the elephant, taking their partial evidence and weaving grand tales (or tails) out of them.  One of the major icons of evolution, the line-up of human evolution from dancing ape to Man the Wise, was described by Henry Gee as tosh.  Tosh means bosh.  Bosh means nonsense.  That means that for decades, school children were taught nonsense, bosh, tosh.  Omigosh, they were awash in bosh, learning tosh with panache.  Do you have any confidence, dear reader, that these blind men called paleoanthropologists, so self-admittedly clueless and subject to crazy paradigm shifts, are capable of coming up with a unified theory of elephant?(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , .

Get close to the wild at Mosetlha

Posted on by

first_imgSunset at Mosetlha Bush Camp. A successful game reintroductionprogramme in the early 1990s meansMadikwe Game Reserve has abundantwildlife. Caroline Lucas serves up a sumptuousmeal in Mosetlha Bush Camp.(Images: Chris Thurman)MEDIA CONTACTS• Mosetlha Bush Camp+27 (11) 444 9345info@thebushcamp.comcaroline@thebushcamp.comChris ThurmanVisitors to South Africa’s 2010 Fifa World Cup will find there are hundreds of luxury game lodges charging dollar rates for tourists to “experience the African bushveld” after the games are done. There’s a lot to be said for the five-star safari option – but does being waited on hand and foot really constitute an authentic bushveld experience? And what if you can’t afford to pay all those dollars?Some national parks have basic accommodation, and there is always the alternative of staying in a nearby town or resort and driving into the park each day – but that’s also not the ideal way to experience the bushveld.Fortunately there is another option, combining reasonable down-to-earth comfort with a really close-up bush experience, as my family and I recently discovered on a trip to the Madikwe Game Reserve. Lying near the border between South Africa and Botswana, it goes by the name of Mosetlha Bush Camp.Roughing it in styleMosetlha was started in the early 1990s as a rustic camp with basic facilities, a place where rangers-in-training and other wilderness enthusiasts came to learn about wildlife conservation during Operation Phoenix, a project to reintroduce game into the Madikwe area.As more and more lodges were built in the reserve and the number of tourists increased, Chris and June Lucas, with their daughter Caroline, opened Mosetlha to the wider public. But they kept the camp’s ecological ethos and relaxed, down-to-earth atmosphere.At Mosetlha, you do things for yourself. There’s an old-school donkey boiler, with water heated in a drum over a fire for bucket showers, and you also take your own water to flush the VIP – ventilated improved pit – toilets.That may sound a little rough and ready, but this really is a comfortable form of camping. In fact, it isn’t actually camping at all. Guests stay in raised wooden cabins, with canvas awnings over the front and back to allow maximum appreciation of the sights and sounds of the bush – including, at night, the not-too-distant howls of hyena. There is no electricity, but oil lamps give a warm and cosy glow.Mosetlha may be a place where you can get the dust of Africa on your feet, but you don’t do everything for yourself. Sumptuous but simple meals are served up from the camp kitchen and eaten communally. In between there are lazy late mornings and early afternoons when you can snooze or read a book. After dark, a roaring fire encourages the cheerful swapping of anecdotes over a glass of wine or a beer from the honesty bar. You settle very easily into the indulgent rhythms of camp life.The focal points of each day are, of course, the morning and evening game drives. Operation Phoenix was tremendously successful, and today Madikwe boasts an abundance of wildlife. With a large mammal population of over 16 000, the reserve provides some of the best game-viewing in the country.Our visit yielded, among other sightings, a close-range encounter with lions at a zebra kill, a pack of wild dogs (very rare), both white and black rhino as well as a leopard up a tree. On one occasion, a pride of lions – moms, dads and cubs – sauntered up to our Land Rover and strolled casually past on either side, leaving our party a little perturbed.You’re guaranteed to see some great game at Madikwe, but there is a lot more to enjoy besides. For the twitchers, there are over 340 bird species to spot. Amateur geologists can take in the striking topography of the area, with numerous koppies and even low mountain peaks rising from the savannah plain.And there’s nothing quite so gratifying as that moment when, just as the off-road bumps are starting to take their toll, your guide stops the vehicle and you climb out to discover a table, magically produced and laden with goodies: coffee and rusks for those brisk mornings, or drinks and snacks in the evenings while the orange disc of the sun slips below the horizon.I told you this was roughing it in style …Rich in historyGood game rangers are walking encyclopaedia when it comes to flora and fauna – and they love to share useful bits of trivia – such as the fact that the collective noun for giraffes is a “journey”. Mosetlha’s knowledgeable guides can also tell you almost anything you might want to know about the region, including its unusual history.Places such as Groot Marico and Mafikeng Road have been immortalised in the stories of Herman Charles Bosman, and the area regularly attracts literary pilgrims for whom the place has a special resonance. But long before Bosman invented his famous serio-comical narrator, Oom Schalk Lourens, the terrain had been criss-crossed by Mzilikazi and the Matabele people, Boer and British soldiers, traders, explorers, hunters and missionaries.If the spirits of the past haunt Madikwe, it is a gentle haunting. Like so many of South Africa’s game reserves, it is a place of tranquillity and astounding beauty. Unlike any other park, however, it is also home to the unusual and memorable wilderness experience that is Mosetlha Bush Camp.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , .

India’s first uterine transplant performed

Posted on by

first_imgA team of 12 doctors at the city’s Galaxy Care Laparoscopy Institute (GCLI) successfully completed the highly complex and delicate procedure of India’s first uterine transplant on a woman from Solapur district on Thursday.The woman suffers from congenital absence of uterus and is to be fitted with her mother’s womb to enable her to conceive normally.The operation, in which the uterus was retrieved from the donor and transplanted into the recipient around 9 a.m., stretched well beyond its projected eight-hour duration exceeding 12 hours in time. The surgeons are retrieving the uterus using a laparoscopic technique. According to team members, the surgery was successful. While the donor’s health is fine, the recipient has been placed under a 24-hour observation, said Dr. Sanjeev Jadhav, one of the members of the team.Dr. Shailesh Puntambekar, Medical Director, GCLI, who headed the surgery, was not available for comment.Earlier, Dr. Puntambekar said the recipient would remain in the ICU for a week and for another fortnight in the general care following the surgery.“During this period, the transplanted uterus will be studied,” he said. The immediate success of the surgery could then be assessed after sonography studies which would determine whether the uterus was getting regular blood flow and functioning normally. The hospital, which has been granted a licence by the State Directorate of Health Services to carry out the uterus transplant, is scheduled to conduct another womb transplant on Friday on a 24-year-old woman from Baroda who suffers from Asherman’s Syndrome (scar tissue in the uterus) and who will receive her mother’s womb.Still in its nascent, experimental stage, only a handful of these operations have met with success in other countries, primarily in Sweden.The operations are meant to help women who want to conceive but cannot because they were born without uterus, suffered damage to it or had to have it removed.Organ rejectionHowever, the 20-odd uterine transplant operations round the world have often been frustrated by organ rejection (in which the patient’s immune system attacks the organ; an infection of the organ; or problems with the organ’s blood supply.)In 2012, doctors at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden led by Dr. Mats Brännström performed nine uterus transplants, resulting in five births. Two of the nine transplants failed during the first year after the surgery and had to be removed.The first baby, born to the recipient in 2014, was delivered prematurely through Caesarean section, and was healthy.If the surgery is successful, both the recipients will be able to conceive using in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) and have children. Both donor and recipients undergo screening procedure post which the uterus is retrieved and transplanted in the recipient, who undergoes three surgeries.The first uterine transplant in the U.S., which was performed in February last year on a 26-year-old woman from Texas, Lindsey MacFarland, at a Cleveland clinic in Ohio, failed despite the efforts of a team of highly experienced doctors who had practised on animals and cadavers.It was the first of 10 uterine transplants planned by the clinic, in an experimental programme meant to enable women without uterus to become pregnant and give birth.In April 2000, a woman who received uterus transplant in Saudi Arabia (considered to be the world’s first uterus transplant) needed the organ removed barely three months after the operation. In that case, the organ deteriorated after clots blocked the blood supply.Another woman in Turkey received uterus transplant from a deceased donor in 2011, and while she was able to conceive, she unfortunately miscarried.In the Swedish trials, the uterus came from a live donor unlike the U.S., where the donor was deceased.Some experts have expressed concern about the operations, terming them an invasive surgical procedure fraught with risks.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , .

Viral gastroenteritis

Posted on by

first_imgDefinitionViral gastroenteritis is sometimes called the “stomach flu.” It refers to swelling orinflammation of the stomach and intestines from a virus. The infection can lead to diarrhea and vomiting.Alternative NamesRotavirus infection; Norwalk virus; Gastroenteritis – viral; Stomach fluCauses, incidence, and risk factorsGastroenteritis can affect one person or a group of people who all ate the same food or drank the same water. The germs may get into the food you eat (called contamination) in different ways.Viral gastroenteritis is a leading cause of severe diarrhea in both adults and children. Many types of viruses can cause gastroenteritis. The most common ones are: Norovirus (Norwalk-like virus) is common among school-age children. It may also cause outbreaks in hospitals and on cruise ships.Rotavirus isthe leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. It can also infect adults who are exposed to children with the virus, and people living in nursing homes.AstrovirusEnteric adenovirusSymptomsSymptoms most often appear within 4 to 48 hours after contact with the contaminated food or water, and include:Abdominal painDiarrheaNausea and vomitingOther symptoms may include:Chills, clammy skin, orsweatingFeverJoint stiffness or muscle painPoor feedingWeight lossSigns and testsThehealth care provider will look for signs of dehydration, including:Dry or sticky mouthLethargy or coma (severe dehydration)Low blood pressureLow or no urine output; concentrated urine that looks dark yellowMarkedly sunken soft spots (fontanelles) on the top of an infants headNo tearsSunken eyesTests that examine stool samples may be used to identify which virus is causing the sickness. This is usually not needed for viral gastroenteritis. A stool culture may be done to find out whether bacteria are causing the problem.advertisementTreatmentThe goal of treatment is to prevent dehydration by making sure the body has enough water and fluids. Fluids and electrolytes (salt and minerals) that are lost through diarrhea or vomiting must be replaced by drinking extra fluids. Even if you are able to eat, you should still drink extra fluids between meals.Older children and adults can drink sports beverages such as Gatorade, but these should not be used for youngerchildren. Instead, use the electrolyte and fluid replacement solutions or freezer pops available in food and drug stores.Do NOT use fruit juice (including apple juice), sodas or cola (flat or bubbly), Jell-O, or broth. All of these have a lot of sugar, which makes diarrhea worse, and they dont replace lost minerals.Drink small amounts of fluid (2-4 oz.) every 30-60 minutes. Do not try to force large amounts of fluid at one time, which can cause vomiting. Use a teaspoon or syringe for an infant or small child.Breast milk or formula can be continued along with extra fluids. You do NOT need to switch to a soy formula.Food may be offeredoften in small amounts. Suggested foods include:Cereals, bread, potatoes, lean meatsPlain yogurt, bananas, fresh applesVegetablesPeople with diarrhea who are unable to drink fluids because of nausea may need intravenous (directly into a vein) fluids. This is especially true in small children.Antibiotics do not work for viruses.Drugs to slow down the amount of diarrhea (anti-diarrheal medications) should not be given without first talking with your health care provider. DO NOT give these anti-diarrheal medications to children unless directed to do so by a health care provider.People taking water pills (diuretics) who develop diarrhea may be told by their health care provider to stop taking the diuretic during the acute episode. However, DO NOT stop taking any prescription medicine without first talking to your health care provider.The risk of dehydration is greatest in infants and young children, so parents should closely monitor the number of wet diapers changed per day when their child is sick.You can buy medicines at the drugstore that can help stop or slow diarrhea.Do not use these medicines without talking to your health care provider if you have bloody diarrhea, a fever, or if the diarrhea is severe.Do not give these medicines to children.Expectations (prognosis)The illness usually runs its course in a few days without treatment.Children may become severely ill from dehydration caused by diarrhea.People with the highest risk for severe gastroenteritis include young children, the elderly, and people who have a suppressed immune system.ComplicationsRotavirus causes severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Severe dehydration and death can occur in thisage group.Calling your health care providerCall your health care provider if diarrhealasts for more than several days or if dehydration occurs. You should also contact yourhealth care providerif you or your child has these symptoms:advertisementBlood in the stoolConfusionDizzinessDry mouthFeeling faintNauseaNo tears when cryingNo urine for 8 hours or moreSunken appearance to the eyesSunken soft spot on an infants head (fontanelle)PreventionMost viruses and bacteria arepassed from person to personby unwashed hands. The best way to prevent viral gastroenteritis is to handle food properly and wash your hands thoroughly after using the toilet.Vaccinationto prevent severe rotavirus infectionis recommended for infants starting at age 2 months.ReferencesDuPontHL. Approach to the patient with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 291.Semrad CE. Approach to the patient with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 142.Giannella RA. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis and bacterial food poisoning. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger & Fordtrans Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2010:chap 107.Zulfigar AB. Acute gastroenteritis in children. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2011:chap 332.Bass DM. Rotaviruses, caliciviruses, and astroviruses. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2011:chap 257.Review Date:4/26/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Divison of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington; and George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , .

Albertan who posed as US veteran on Nov 11 guilty of unlawful

Posted on by

first_imgRED DEER, Alta. – A man who posed as a U.S. Marine veteran during Remembrance Day ceremonies in central Alberta has pleaded guilty to unlawful use of military uniforms and medals.A third charge against Peter Toth, 59, was dropped.Toth was sentenced Wednesday in Red Deer to 18 months of probation and 200 hours of community service.Court heard that he has since destroyed the uniform and military decorations.His lawyer said Toth has struggled with depression, understands that what he did was wrong and feels remorse.Last November a group called Stolen Valour Canada began looking into a report of a man claiming to be a former U.S. Marine who attended ceremonies on Nov. 11 at schools in Red Deer.A picture taken at one event shows Toth dressed in a desert camouflage uniform festooned with military medals and ribbons.Stolen Valour officials said he was wearing rank badges in the wrong place, incorrect insignia and claimed to have been wounded in Afghanistan in 2005 despite saying he had retired from the military in 1985.Outside court, Gord Swaitkewich, a former soldier who is a spokesman for Stolen Valour Canada, said justice has been served.“It was a little bit of a process but any win is a win,” Swaitkewich said.Swaitkewich said his next order of business is to get the veterans license plate from Toth’s vehicle removed.“He is not a veteran, he has no legal right to have that plate.”Robert Dale, a retired sergeant, said he was also gratified with how the case turned out.“We’re not going to stand by for somebody stealing valour from our fallen,” Dale said.“He claimed he was in Afghanistan? We lost 185 people in Afghanistan and for him to do what he did is like him desecrating their graves and we’re not going to stand for it.”Dale said they hope the publicity of Toth’s case will send a message to the public that soldiers deserve respect. (RD News Now)last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , .