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UK regional Flybe spreads its European wings

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first_imgBrexit and other uncertainties are not stopping UK regional carrier Flybe from planning an ambitious expansion that takes it beyond Britain and into continental Europe.In August this year, Flybe launched its first two routes not touching its home market:  from Hanover in northern Germany to both Lyon, in France, and Italy’s Milan-Malpensa.It is not planning to replicate the 15 per cent capacity expansion seen in the past financial year but is looking at an increase of 6 per cent. By March next year, it’s fleet will consist of 85 aircraft, 11 more than a year earlier, with 60 Q400s among them.But Flybe hasn’t lowered its ambitions by any means.“We have a desire to be European”, says chief revenue officer Vincent Hodder.  “And there is no better time than now to start this journey into the future.“You have to distinguish between a short-term uncertainty and the long-term success of the Flybe business model.”Hodder says there are currently about 13 million passengers travelling on routes not served by low-cost carriers or with very limited competition on them.“We are a regional airline flying underneath the radar of LCCs, which is a great opportunity,’’ he adds.On a whopping 80 per cent of its 218 routes, serving 75 destinations in ten countries, Flybe flies without any competition.  It faces competition from easyJet on just 10 routesFlybe’s big advantage here is its efficient fleet of  Q400s and it will have 54 at year-end.   The regional carrier is the second biggest operator of the turboprop worldwide and, with just 78 seats, the aircraft enable it to operate a route profitably if it yields 40,000 passengers annually.By contrast, easyJet needs at least 100,000 paying customers per year to profitably operate a route with an Airbus A319.Flybe  estimates 39 million people in Western Europe are currently underserved with regional connectivity.“If we could carry just 10 per cent of that, we could double in size”, calculates Hodder.While this bold vision could be acutely threatened by Brexit, Hodder insists: “I don’t think Brexit will force us to give up such routes as Hanover to Lyon. We will always find ways to get around restrictions that might be imposed by governments. One of our great advantages is to be flexible and adapt to change, and very quickly.”A major focus for Flybe currently is on Germany, where it an expanded offering will see Düsseldorf become Flybe’s first base outside the UK by fall 2017.“We plan to station initially three Q400s there and hire German crews for cockpit and cabin”, says chief operations officer Luke Farajallah.Another aspect of Flybe’s success is its ability to combine elements of both network carriers and LCCs.  It operates  a decentralised route network means it operates from 10 bases in addition to its corporate headquarters in the southern English city of Exeter.The biggest base is Birmingham, where currently 11 of its total fleet of 76 aircraft are stationed, followed by Southampton, with nine aircraft, and Belfast with eight.It serves 40 regional airports in the UK and boasts by far the densest domestic network.“One of two passengers flying within the UK without touching London is a Flybe customer”, says Hodder. “We are operating 53 per cent of all domestic flights within the main British isle.”The airline was founded in 1979 as Jersey European Airlines but became British European from 2000 before adopting its current name in 2002.It came close to bankruptcy in  2014 but chief executive Saad Hammad, who arrived in 2013, succeeded in turning around the company and returning it to profit in 2015-16.In the first half of 2016-17, however, profits halved and in October, Hammad unexpectedly resigned without giving reasons.The departure came as British airlines face an uncertain future with little clarity about the ramifications of Brexit and what traffic rights they will have to the continent, and within the European Union.At the same time, the pound weakened and lacklustre passenger demand and overcapacities in the European short haul markets further worsened the outlook.During the first half of 2016-17, Flybe’s capacity increased 13.5 per cent while actual passenger numbers only rose by about 7 per cent, prompting load factors to fall to 72 per cent.“We have an offering of frequencies and density in our schedules equal to a network airline, and a cost base like an LCC,’’ says Hodder. “We sell 80 per cent of our tickets via our website, another LCC element.“At the same time, more like a network carrier, we are working a lot with codeshare agreements and interlining, with Air France, Etihad, Emirates or Virgin Atlantic, in Europe also with Air Berlin now.’’last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 116 | Dusty brains and new team member Dusty Sonnenburg.

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 116th episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, includes hosts Joel Penhorwood, Matt Reese, Kolt Buchenroth, Bart Johnson and new team member Dusty Sonnenburg. On today’s episode, the crew gets back into their normal routine after the 2019 Ohio State Fair. In the busy week of the state fair, Matt spoke with Governor Mike Dewine and Lamb and Wool Ambassador Emma Preston about their personal experiences at the state fair.last_img

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Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

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first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.Photo from Betty Mohlenbrock. Used with her permission.Recently the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, located at the University of Illinois, discovered the work of Betty Mohlenbrock, an alumni of our home campus! We were thrilled to have the opportunity to talk with her and learn more about what she’s been doing to help children and families in her career. This month, we share excerpts from that conversation with you!Betty graduated from the University of Illinois. Through her early career she developed a strong belief in the importance of family relationships and maintaining strong bonds within a family. She has since worked tirelessly to design programs that promote these family relationships through reading, despite various obstacles a family might be facing.In 1990, she began a military outreach program called United Through Reading that uses video to virtually bring deployed parents into the home to read to their children. During the late 1990s and early 2000s, multiple branches of service and United Service Organizations (USO) widely embraced this program across the globe. In 2016, Betty’s work as the founder and CEO of United Through Reading earned her The Congressional Medal of Honor Society Community Service Hero Award.The following are some of Betty’s thoughts and comments about her experiences.Can you please describe United Through Reading’s ‘conception/birth’? For example, when did you first get the idea to start it and why? What sparked you? How did you find funding? What challenges did you face in starting it, if any?My nonprofit journey started officially in 1989 when I formed the Family Literacy Foundation (later to become United Through Reading). I continue under the umbrella of Reading Legacies today. The mission has always been to facilitate supportive relationships for children through read-aloud experiences so that children can learn to love reading and feel the stability and confidence of caring relationships.I grew up in Champaign-Urbana, IL as the daughter of two educators. They were fabulous role models in every way, and they instilled in me an interest and passion for children at an early age.I studied education at the University of Illinois, and went on to get my Master’s Degree in Education with a special focus on the Teaching of Reading. I met and married Bill Mohlenbrock when he was a student at the University of Illinois as well.   After graduating, I taught third grade for three years and then left the classroom to raise a family while I tutored children with reading difficulties. Eventually, my husband’s career took us to St. Louis for medical school where I went back to teaching.While raising our daughter and working with other children through the local public school, I became acutely aware of both the benefits of reading to children and the struggles that many children were experiencing when they have missed out on supportive read-aloud time with family and other adults. My husband, Bill, and I discussed what could be done to serve this population of children and families.During this time, the Vietnam War occurred and Bill went into the Navy as a Flight Surgeon. This Navy experience took us to San Diego, CA where Bill then deployed for ten months. Our daughter turned two years old while he was deployed and when he returned she did not know him. It was heartbreaking. That experience indelibly imprinted on our hearts and caused us to enter into another discussion as to how to solve this problem for children, as well.We formed the Family Literacy Foundation (now United Through Reading) with the vision to help all children in our country, starting with the military community. It was based on my personal experience as a Navy daughter and spouse. The journey is discussed in more detail in this historical timeline, which states that, “In 1990, [Betty Mohlenbrock] began a military outreach program utilizing video technology to bring the visual image and voice of the parent into the home while separated from the family…”What were your goals for the project and how have those goals evolved?The original goals for the project were very clear and quite simple: Instill the love of reading in children and provide stable, comforting relationships for them through the bonding experience of reading aloud with them. Those goals have never changed – and the mission has not wavered either. I attribute the success of these endeavors to my ability to stay true to the mission all of these years. This requires discipline and education for all involved on the team. A strong team is essential in any successful endeavor.What outcomes did you see emerge from United Through Reading?The outcomes have been astounding and consistent:Children became more interested in books and readingThey did better in schoolTheir relationships with their parents, other family members, and community members became stable and positiveWhat are your current goals/dreams for UTR?My current goals and dreams are much larger than UTR. All branches embraced the military program around 2006. Target Corporation discovered our organization, under its original name Family Literacy Foundation, that same year. They became our national sponsor at a very generous dollar amount. This put us on the map and allowed us to take the program to all branches on bases and installations all over the world. The other key ingredient in our growth was our alliance with the United Service Organization (USO). This wonderful organization was looking for quality family-focused programs and we were looking for facilities around the world. This was a match made in heaven. Also in 2006, the Peter Drucker School of Management, out of 500 nonprofit competitors, selected us for our Unique Innovative Program called “United Through Reading.” Our organization then decided to take the name of our program for our overall organizational name.What other projects have you worked on, or are you currently working on, that serve children in unique circumstances?While waiting for the military program to take off, we had programs that reached out to at-risk teens to learn about volunteerism through reading to young children regularly after school. We also reached out to children of incarcerated parents as they are vulnerable to school failure and other cycles of failure without parents in their lives.When I retired from United Through Reading, the organization decided to focus exclusively on our military program and asked if I wanted to do something with the other programs. Of course I said yes and came out of retirement to start Reading Legacies. Reading Legacies has the same mission of reaching out to children facing difficult situations in order to help prevent future struggles in reading, education, and life. With hundreds of volunteers giving of their time throughout San Diego County, we have served over 15,000 children and their family members by providing close to 30,000 shared-reading program experiences for them. Our Reading Legacies programs were launched in 2010.Military families wishing to participate in United Through Reading’s program can find information about how to do so here.Those wanting to support United Through Reading’s mission and programming can learn more here.This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and YouTube.last_img read more

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ONE Championships signs US broadcast deal with Turner Sports

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first_imgONE Championship has a total of 24 live events that will be broadcasted through B/R Live.“We are thrilled with the partnership with Turner Sports, a truly iconic industry leader of premium sports content, to bring authentic, world-class martial arts action to American fans,” said ONE Chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong in a statement.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief“ONE Championship is one of the most popular mixed martial arts organizations in the world, with a high concentration of passionate fans that make it a perfect fit for B/R Live and TNT,” said Turner Sports President Lenny Daniels. “We will leverage every opportunity within our portfolio to partner with ONE Championship and help further its footprint in the US.”Although ONE is primarily rooted in Asia, it went on an aggressive recruiting spree in the last quarter of 2018 signing former UFC champions Eddie Alvarez and Demetrious Johnson in October. ONE champions from Team Lakay. Photo from Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—ONE Championship and Turner Sports have signed a three-year partnership that will see the live events of the mixed martial arts promotion get distributed to the United States.Also included in the agreement is the role of B/R Live—Turner Sports’ live streaming service—which will distribute programming surrounding the live events starting January 19.ADVERTISEMENT Welterweight star Sage Northcutt was also added into the ONE roster in November.“As the home of martial arts, ONE Championship has a simple formula of values, heroes, and stories that have resonated deeply across the globe,” said Sityodtong. “We look forward to showcasing the greatest martial artists in the world.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening MOST READ LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss PBA commissioner: No precedent to suspend Mark Barroca on groin hit Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ LATEST STORIES SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issuelast_img read more

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