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The Magical People Of Mysteryland 2016

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first_imgLoad remaining images Another Mysteryland went down in history this past weekend at Bethel Woods, NY, the site of the original Woodstock, drawing in tens of thousands of attendees to experience some of the world’s premier DJs complete with top-notch production and all-around positive vibes. Fest-goers from all over the world flocked to escape the real world and dance their cares away, fueled by the ferocious beats of Odesza, Skrillex, Bassnectar, GRiZ, Gramatik, The Chainsmokers, Zeds Dead, Claude VonStroke, and hundreds of others.The most important headliner, however, was YOU! Check out some of our favorite people shots, courtesy of Lucent Illusion Photography. Full Gallery:last_img

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Roger Waters Performs New “Déjà Vu” On Colbert

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first_imgOn Monday night, Roger Waters made his return to late night television with a performance on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert in support of his forthcoming solo record. He, along with Lucius’s Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, Atoms For Peace drummer Joey Waronker, and a full orchestral string section, performed his newest track, “Déjà Vu,” after releasing its studio version earlier in the day.The song is the second to be released, following “Smell the Roses,” from the upcoming solo album Is This the Life We Really Want?, due out on June 2nd. This new record marks the first in 25 years after the Pink Floyd singer’s most recent solo album, Amused To Death (1992).Watch the live performance of “Déjà Vu” below:Below is the studio version of “Déjà Vu”:Waters is currently preparing for his upcoming Us And Them North American tour, which kicks off end of May and extends through late October. The tour is named after the iconic song on 1973 Pink Floyd album Dark Side Of The Moon. Waters promises a mixture of Pink Floyd songs, solo material, and songs from the upcoming album! Check out the full tour schedule below.Roger Waters Tour Dates05/26 – Kansas City, MO @ Sprint Center05/28 – Louisville, KY @ KFC Yum! Center05/30 – St. Louis, MO @ Scottrade Center06/01 – Tulsa, OK @ BOK Center06/03 – Denver, CO @ Pepsi Center06/04 – Denver, CO @ Pepsi Center06/07 – San Jose, CA @ SAP Center at San Jose06/10 – Oakland, [email protected] Oracle Arena06/12 – Sacramento, CA @ Golden 1 Center06/14 – Phoenix, AZ @ Gila River Arena06/16 – Las Vegas, NV @ T-Mobile Arena06/20 – Los Angeles, CA @ STAPLES Center06/21 – Los Angeles, CA @ STAPLES Center06/24 – Seattle, WA @ Tacoma Dome06/27 – Los Angeles, CA @ STAPLES Center07/01 – San Antonio, TX @ AT&T Center07/03 – Dallas, TX @ American Airlines Center07/06 – Houston, TX @ Toyota Center07/08 – New Orleans, LA @ Smoothie King Center07/11 – Tampa, FL @ Amalie Arena07/13 – Miami, FL @ AmericanAirlines Arena07/16 – Atlanta, GA @ Infinite Energy Center07/18 – Greensboro, NC @ Greensboro Coliseum07/20 – Columbus, OH @ Nationwide Arena07/22 – Chicago, IL @ United Center07/23 – Chicago, IL @ United Center07/26 – St. Paul, MN @ Xcel Energy Center07/29 – Milwaukee, WI @ Bradley Center08/02 – Detroit, MI @ The Palace of Auburn Hills08/04 – Washington, DC @ Verizon Center08/08 – Philadelphia, PA @ Wells Fargo Center08/09 – Philadelphia, PA @ Wells Fargo Center08/13 – Nashville, TN @ Bridgestone Arena09/07 – Newark, NJ @ Prudential Center09/11 – Brooklyn, NY @ Barclays Center09/12 – Brooklyn, NY @ Barclays Center09/15 – Uniondale, NY @ Nassau Coliseum09/16 – Uniondale, NY @ Nassau Coliseum09/19 – Pittsburgh, PA @ PPG Paints Arena09/21 – Cleveland, OH @ Quicken Loans Arena09/23 – Albany, NY @ Times Union Center09/24 – Hartford, CT @ XL Center09/27 – Boston, MA @ TD Garden09/28 – Boston, MA @ TD Garden10/02 – Toronto, ON @ Air Canada Centre10/03 – Toronto, ON @ Air Canada Centre10/06 – Quebec City, QC @ Videotron Centre10/07 – Quebec City, QC @ Videotron Centre10/10 – Ottawa, ON @ Canadian Tire Centre10/16 – Montreal, QC @ Bell Centre10/17 – Montreal, QC @ Bell Centre10/22 – Winnipeg, MB @ MTS Centre10/24 – Edmonton, AB @ Rogers Place10/28 – Vancouver, BC @ Rogers Arenalast_img read more

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After Ferguson, the ripples across Harvard

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first_imgThey are short, stark sentences, seared into the public consciousness in recent months: Hands up, don’t shoot. I can’t breathe. Black lives matter.The killings of unarmed black men by white police officers last summer — the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and the chokehold death of Eric Garner, captured on video, in Staten Island, N.Y. — and the grand jury decisions against indictments in those cases sparked shock and outrage that led to massive protests across the country, including here at Harvard.Students, faculty, and staff from across the University took to the streets to march, held rallies and vigils, and staged “die-ins” in solidarity with Brown’s and Garner’s families, and  to protest the use of military-level force by U.S. law enforcement against citizens and its disproportionate deployment in communities of color. The protests decried centuries of unpunished violence against African-Americans, as part of the growing social movement Black Lives Matter.Brown’s and Garner’s deaths also have prompted widespread soul-searching, raising questions in every corner of the University about how Harvard can lead the way forward, using tools like the law, government and policymaking, public health, education, and religion to root out the systemic inequities that have fueled and thrived on racism and racial injustice in America.At Harvard Law School (HLS), that question has been felt acutely, prompting an array of personal and public efforts, including panels, talks, conferences, seminars, in-class discussions, and faculty opinion pieces in recent months. In December, Dean Martha Minow convened a School-wide meeting for students, faculty, and staff to discuss the grand jury decisions.“The nation has witnessed lethal violence against unarmed individuals who are members of visible minorities, and there is a widespread perception that procedures meant to secure legal accountability aren’t working,” Minow told the Gazette in a statement last month about why these incidents have resonated so deeply at HLS. “The ideal of equal justice under law animates our law school and informs our daily work. Many of us here feel a special responsibility to push for change.”For some in the law school community, that change includes a re-evaluation of what students should be learning.“As I’m about to graduate, I can say with total certainty that as a student at Harvard Law School, it’s incredibly easy to avoid ever having to think about racial injustice; it’s incredibly easy to avoid ever having to talk about, in your classroom, issues of social injustice or broader power inequality,” said Jacob Reisberg, a third-year student, during a Feb. 13 symposium, “Law School or Justice School: Connecting the Dots Between Harvard and Ferguson,” which featured Minow and a panel of distinguished scholars on race and the law. “What can we do as an institution to make these discussions part of the mandatory curriculum?”Panelist Jon Hanson, the Alfred Smart Professor of Law at HLS, called this a “historic moment” for legal education.“We really need to reinvent our burdens of proof, reinvent what our presumptions are. Legal education ought to be in part about interrogating those and in part about educating our students in what those are. But also how they’re reacting to those and how their own psychology” contributes to inequities that pervade the criminal justice system, said Hanson, who teaches the “Systemic Justice” course and leads the Justice Lab project, a new effort to get students to start working through intractable societal ills using the law. “If we’re going to do it with any administration, at any moment, this is the one.”Noting that such major changes require broad consensus, Minow recommended students consider working in one of 26 HLS-affiliated legal clinics to gain vital, real-world skills while making a difference in the lives of people who need help. She also acknowledged that students have a right to demand more.“The heart of a law school is about preparing people for a system that exists and critiquing that system,” Minow said of the “law school paradox”: needing to teach students how to succeed within a flawed structure, yet wanting to make sure students understand and critique those flaws, and perhaps one day fix them. “If we do not prepare you for the existing system, we are not helping you do what you want to do. If we prepare you only for the existing system, we’re not doing what is our obligation.”Those involved say that the dialogue among HLS students, faculty, and administrators is clearing the air for those who felt that their concerns about racial justice were not being heard or taken seriously enough last semester.“I think in that silence, it motivated students to be even more active, to have more protests, to have more die-ins. Since then, it’s been received, and we’ve begun to have more events and discussions where faculty members and the administration are participating,” said Lakeisha Williams, a second-year HLS student who oversees publicity for the Harvard Black Law Students Association’s annual spring conference, held Feb. 27 and 28. The conference focused on how “Black Lives Matter.”“Just in talking with my peers, a lot of them have applauded our administration and our faculty members in really engaging us in dialogue and giving us concrete guidance for things that we can do at our level,” Williams said. “And then I have other peers who feel as if it’s just a conversation and that we need more.”“Even before, but especially since, the decisions in Ferguson and New York galvanized the nation’s attention, faculty and students at each of Harvard’s Schools have been engaging deeply in scholarship and teaching related to issues of race, ethnicity and injustice that are at the heart of the Black Lives Matter movement. In these ways, and through the raising of all our voices, universities like Harvard can make a powerful contribution toward advancing the critical principles of fundamental justice and equality before the law,” said President Drew Faust. Faust attended the Institute of Politics’ Ferguson panel at the Harvard Kennedy School in the fall. File photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerRacism harms healthLike HLS, students at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health felt the sting of the Brown and Garner cases, and have urged the School to play a larger role not only in engaging in public discourse about racial violence, but in instigating change on and off campus.School officials held a widely attended “town hall” for the Harvard Chan School community in December, while Dean Julio Frenk issued a statement acknowledging the controversy and recommitting to scholarly research that identifies and reduces disparities that lead to health inequities. Frenk will host another town hall in March to update students and provide feedback.“In public health, there’s a strong orientation toward social justice. And, of course, violence and health are intimately connected,” said Meredith Rosenthal, Ph.D. ’98, a professor of health economics and policy and associate dean for diversity. “There were two major streams of work that the students asked us to commit to. One was to position the School — and they are really looking for the University to position itself this way — in a way to support social change … by organizing intellectual, scientific contributions that can really support evidence-based change.”Last month, the School held a forum, “Race, Criminal Justice, and Health,” featuring faculty from Harvard Chan School, HLS, and Harvard Medical School (HMS), to examine how disparate treatment under the law and in the criminal justice system can affect health and the role race plays in a host of environmental factors that lead to poor health.“It’s been documented that racism itself harms health. If you are an individual in a racial minority, the effect of racism on a whole lot of health outcomes directly has been documented. Our faculty, including David Williams, Nancy Krieger, and Laura Kubzansky, have done work in this area,” said Rosenthal.“But racism has much broader and deeper effects … on income, on educational opportunities, other opportunities, and all of those socioeconomic consequences are extremely important for health. Your ability to thrive depends a lot on your socioeconomic context,” she said. “In public health, we know that these social determinants of health contribute so much more to health than medical care and health insurance, the things that we often think about.”Internally, Rosenthal said students have asked the administration to examine its policies and outcomes regarding student, staff, and faculty diversity and to explain what it’s doing to improve the climate for and recruitment of under-represented minorities. As a first step, the Harvard Chan School just published a 35-page report that documents those efforts as a starting point to suggest ways to increase awareness and a sense of inclusion for students from minority backgrounds who may feel marginalized.The School, in the midst of curriculum reform, is considering future training for students, staff, and faculty around issues of privilege so that people work more effectively in diverse contexts, and will add “cultural competence” to its requirements for a master’s degree in public health. The details of that process are expected in a report next fall. “We’re trying to define what that will mean and how students will get it,” said Rosenthal.Students’ intensity, unityLisa M. Coleman, the University’s chief diversity officer, works closely with student groups and administrators year-round, but since the protests began she and her team, as well as other diversity officers across campus, have been busy serving as facilitators and gathering information about events and student-led initiatives taking place across Harvard.Coleman, who took the post in 2010, said she has never seen Harvard students respond to news events with such sustained intensity and broad unity, and was not expecting the protests to encompass such a far-reaching slate of issues.“We, meaning administrators, did not understand” initially the broad ripple effects the Ferguson and Staten Island cases would spawn, she said, although further dialogue helped clarify the students’ concerns. “The other thing that became very clear to us was that this was a conversation about learning.”Coleman said students are “concerned because what it sparked in them is the issue about ‘what matters,’ and what matters to them right now is: Are they getting … [the] education to be able to deal with difference and, thus, help to work on global issues?” One other development, she added, is that “It’s not only disenfranchised students who are leading the efforts. This is a collective effort engaging students from all backgrounds.”Coleman said students across Harvard have expressed concerns about race and ethnicity, as well as gender and LGBTQ issues, with particular attention paid to the recruitment and retention of students, the diversity of faculty and staff — including those within the senior administration at each School― the importance of instruction and training, and the ways in which the University educates the community about difference so the burden of managing diversity issues doesn’t fall on students alone.So far, there has been a robust, open discussion between students and administrators over short- and long-term priorities, Coleman said. “It will be important to continue the momentum, and it remains crucial to communicate all that we are doing across our many Schools,” she said.Justice and healingStudents and faculty at Harvard Divinity School (HDS) were energized early on by the Ferguson protests. Led by the Rev. Jonathan Walton, the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister, about a dozen students, including Melissa Bartholomew, M.Div. ’16, drove to Missouri in August to lend their support and their voices to the outcry.Bartholomew and Rachel Foran, M.T.S. ’16, are co-founders of a new student group, HDS Racial Justice and Healing Initiative, which is drafting a proposal to submit to the School’s administration later this semester outlining ways to ensure that strategies to confront and resolve racial and social injustice have a lasting home at the HDS, “to really make sure our work lives on beyond the students that are here today,” said Bartholomew.“The blessing and beauty of our work at HDS is that we’re not fighting against our administration. We’re not fighting to get them to hear what we’re trying to say or to realize that these are important issues. They’ve been very clear, through their presence and through their words, that, ‘We get it, and these are important issues and let’s figure out how we can address them as a community’ … which is really, really great,” said Bartholomew.“So we’ve been really thinking about our capacity as ministers, as scholars, practitioners, [and] intellectuals, and the unique way that we can contribute to this work so that the work we do is sustainable and leads to transformation, because we’re all committed to doing this in a different way and getting different results,” she said.The issues also have given Bartholomew a fresh sense of purpose.“I’m an African-American woman. If I didn’t have this as an outlet, if I didn’t have these tangible things to be working on in the midst of these very difficult situations, I’d get depressed, I’d be discouraged,” she said. “But these experiences — working with Rachel and working with all of our students — really invigorates me and gives me hope. And I think other students probably feel the same way and definitely feel great about … while we’re in school, applying what we know and thinking through real-life problems and not waiting until after school to join some organization to try and get things done.”Critical work to be doneWith policy-making, good government, and leadership as core domains of Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), the Ferguson case provoked immediate and strong reactions on campus, which continued in the months following Brown’s death.Jayme Johnson, a mid-career M.P.A. and class representative to the HKS student government, said there was some tension at the School largely because neither the student body nor the administration “knew quite what to do” in their initial responses.“Last semester was very emotional, [there was] lots of frustration, and what we’ve decided is that we are a policy School and we should be working toward a tangible, constructive response to this,” he said.Dean David Ellwood and Karen Jackson-Weaver, senior associate dean for degree programs and student affairs, have been very supportive, he said. “It’s very much a partnership.”“There is critical work to be done in the areas of racial equality, violence prevention, economic inequity, and in our justice system, and I am confident the members of this community have the knowledge, creativity, and drive to help move our nation forward,” said Ellwood in a Jan. 29 letter to the School. “It is our responsibility and our privilege as part of the HKS community to take on tough issues and to help find solutions for difficult public problems.”In early February, Ellwood moderated a JFK Jr. Forum event, “Challenges to Democracy: The Future of Policing,” featuring Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, and Phillip Goff, a visiting scholar on race and criminal justice.Several new courses are underway that address topics like leadership and diversity, narrowing the racial achievement gap, and the U.S. criminal justice system. There is also a series of faculty-led discussions on policing. Jackson-Weaver lead a communications workshop, “Race and Difficult Conversations,” on Feb. 23, while the Shorenstein Center for Media, Politics, and Public Policy is holding a periodic study group with Michele Norris, a National Public Radio host and a spring fellow, on “How Shifts in Race and Cultural Identity Influence Politics, Policy, and Pop Culture,” that also began Feb. 23.Much of the group energy at HKS is directed outward this semester. About 100 students in HKS student government and those interested in criminal justice careers held brainstorming sessions, assisted by HKS faculty, activists, and attorneys from Black Lives Matters, clergy, and experts from other universities, to draft policy ideas that they submitted to the President’s Task Force on 21st-Century Policing in late February. President Obama formed the task force in December to examine how best to reduce crime while building trust and collaboration between law enforcement and citizens. Its first report is expected later this month.Johnson, an inspector with London’s Metropolitan Police, said the group will offer suggestions across a range of issues and best practices, such as: whether police should be guardians or warriors; whether the right people are being recruited; whether police should investigate themselves; an evaluation of stop-and-frisk tactics; the scarcity of data about police-related deaths; and whether police ought to use nonlethal force more frequently. The group hopes to play a role in formulating the task force’s final report, expected this summer.“Unlike many movements, there’s often no tangible end,” said Johnson. “But with this, we feel we’ve got a way forward.”last_img read more

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Ben Stiller Gets a Boxing Lesson From the Cast of Rocky

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first_img Andy Karl View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 17, 2014 Star Files The Italian Stallion welcomed a few new visitors into the Broadway ring on May 17—Ben Stiller, his wife, actress Christine Taylor, and their adorable kids, Ella and Quinlin! The whole family caught a matinee of the hit boxing musical, then headed backstage to meet Rocky stars Andy Karl and Margo Seibert. Directed by Alex Timbers, the stage adaptation of the Oscar-winning blockbuster film tells the story of a down-on-his luck boxer who gets the chance of a lifetime to fight heavyweight champion Apollo Creed. See Stiller and his family joining the fight, then catch Rocky at the Winter Garden Theatre! Rocky Related Showslast_img read more

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Vermont Nonprofits Receive More Than $200,000 from Blue Cross Health Improvement Projects

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first_imgVermont Nonprofits Receive More Than $200,000 from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont for Health Improvement ProjectsBerlin, VT – More than 100 Vermont non-profit organizations have received grants totaling $205,000 from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) in the first half of 2008, the state’s largest health insurer has announced.The funds are granted to improve health education and promote healthy lifestyles, and for direct services. BCBSVT executives cited the connection between improved health and lower health insurance rates as the incentive for its support and collaboration with community-based organizations receiving the grants. Individual grants typically range between $250 and $2,000.”Partnering with like-minded organizations seeking to improve the health of our citizens benefits all of our customers and the state,” explained William R. Milnes, Jr., president and CEO. “Evidence clearly supports the value of these programs for improving health, and healthier Vermonters require fewer visits to the doctor, thereby helping to contain the cost of insurance premiums.”In addition to direct grants, the insurer also administers the Vermont Caring Foundation, a non-profit foundation it created in 2005 to enhance the health and well being of Vermont’s children. The Foundation granted nearly $14,000 in the first half of the year to four projects that promote physical activity and combat obesity.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters. It employs over 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and branch office in Williston, and offers group and individual health plans to Vermonters. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.(End)last_img read more

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Brentwood Gang Member Charged With Murder

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York U.S. Marshals apprehended Thursday a reputed member of the Brentwood chapter of the street gang MS-13 who was wanted for his alleged role in killing a teenager last year, authorities said.Oscar Wellman Espinoza-Merino, also known as “Speedy” and “Petey,” was indicted on charges of conspiracy to commit murder in-aid-of racketeering, murder in-aid-of racketeering, obstruction-of-justice murder and firearms offenses.Loretta Lynch, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said that the gang, which has roots in El Salvador, is responsible for a “particularly brutal brand of violence and lawlessness in neighborhoods throughout Queens and Long Island.”Prosecutors said the 32-year-old suspect and other alleged gang members lured Sidney Valverde, a 19-year-old fellow MS-13 member, to Miller Place Beach under the guise of conducting business there, when they allegedly shot him in the back of the head on Feb. 25, 2014.Investigators believe that the gang killed Valverde because they suspected him of cooperating with federal law enforcement, authorities said. A beachcomber found his body two weeks after he was slain.Byron “Viruz” Lopez, the 23-year-old alleged leader of a Queens chapter of the gang, was previously accused of ordering the murder. He has pleaded not guilty to the same charges as Espinoza-Merino, who is scheduled to be arraigned Friday at Brooklyn federal court.The arrests were the result of a joint investigation involving Suffolk County police, New York City police, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Explosives and Firearms.If convicted, Espinoza-Merino and Byron Lopez each face up to life in prison.last_img read more

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Diversity, equity, and inclusion in credit union leadership matters

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first_img 50SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Joy Smith-Durant Joy Smith-Durant is a Chief Lending Officer for Eagle Federal Credit Union in Baton Rouge, LA. Joy earned her Doctor of Business Administration degree, with a concentration in Leadership, from … Web: https://eaglefederal.org Details In the wake of the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis Police, leaders in many industries, including the credit union industry, have had conversations and made public statements committing to reduce unconscious bias and step up efforts and measures of accountability in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within their organizations. Although public statements and commitment to change are grand gestures, there has to be more than lip service for the change to be effective. Credit unions thrive by serving and reinvesting in their local communities. Yet, most credit unions do not have a volunteer board or leadership team that mirrors the changing demographic of the members in their community. How do we move from talking about change to taking steps towards credit union leadership becoming more diverse, equitable, and inclusive, and why does it matter?The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) reported that in 2018 the typical credit union board was made up of 90% white and 8% black and credit union leadership team made up of 90% white and 5% black. Using this information, take a minute to evaluate your board and leadership team. If the credit union lacks diversity in mission-critical positions where leaders make critical decisions that impact its membership, it is time to act. Action is not merely giving an appearance of diversity because you can check the box for having one minority as a volunteer or in leadership. Doing so is called tokenism, which gives a false sense of achievement and has no impact or brings about change. Positions of authority must be culturally balanced to mirror your membership, which will leverage diverse perspectives to ensure the voice of people who look like and have had the same experiences as members are at the head table.One of the first steps to move towards having a diverse leadership team is for the current leaders to determine if everyone within the credit union has had the same opportunities to reach their full potential, and if not, acknowledge the inequities within the organization, specifically within leadership. Once leaders acknowledge the inequities, an assessment of practices, processes, and culture should occur. Through assessments, leaders can see how unintentional bias has entangled itself within the organization creating limitations for team members. A case for change, strategy, and shift to a coaching culture could counter the unintentionally biased culture by ensuring there are career growth and development opportunities available for employees. Leaders should remain open-minded and transparent because transparency is key to fostering an equitable playing field.Integrating DEI in succession plans and recruitment strategies is necessary to ensure credit unions move towards leadership becoming more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. Discussing and updating these plans only when there is an immediate need to fill board or leadership vacancies is not enough. Instead, they should be an integral part of succession planning and recruiting and often reviewed and updated.  Credit unions should seek and maintain a continually evolving list of candidates who can potentially advance the credit union’s vision and strategic goals and have the desired skills and experiences. These candidates should also cover the full spectrum of human demographic differences, including, but not limited to, age, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. When credit unions foster an environment where DEI is transparent, recruiting and retaining talent is not an issue because candidates will see that the credit union supports diversity and equity, but also has an inclusive work environment where all employees’ unique characteristics and ideas add value.  So why does any of this matter? DEI, just as the credit union’s culture and strategies, is fluid and ever-changing, so there have to be ever-changing and transparent solutions. Diverse viewpoints help leaders understand and be informed by perspectives that differ from their own, shifting from one dimensional to a multi-dimensional outlook. When diverse leaders come together to solve complex problems, their individual cultural experiences intertwine to create innovative solutions that benefit the majority. Credit unions exist to serve their members and local communities, including underserved communities; therefore, the more we can diversify volunteers and leadership in credit unions, the more we will fully serve our purpose.last_img read more

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AHF: The Mediterranean has not yet reached its peak and there is still room for growth

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first_imgThe seventh Adria Hotel Forum, which gathered over 350 participants this year as well, confirmed the status of one of the five largest hotel and investment conferences in Europe. The last panel of the Adria Hotel Forum was “Inland development – let’s look at those who already did it – and what does it take to develop inland”. In order to develop onshore investments, good co-operation with local communities and authorities is needed, the panelists concluded.  The return of markets that have seen declines in previous years is not seen by panelists as a problem, and the Mediterranean, in their view, has not yet reached its peak and there is still room for growth.  On the second day of the Adria Hotel Forum, which was held in Belgrade this year under the title “Is the future bright?”, There was talk about employees in tourism, which, as said, accounts for 30 percent of the costs of each hotel and is a growing problem of the sector. He also stressed that workers from Serbia go to Croatia for better wages, from Croatia to Western countries, from where workers go to Scandinavia. “It’s a vicious circle”, He emphasized.  The next panel was dedicated to new lifestyle brands that are becoming increasingly popular. “The trend is to reduce the number of rooms. That is market demand. Design is the only thing that keeps people in the hotel. Good restaurants can be found anywhere, but the atmosphere we create in the hotel is what makes them stay”, Said Bojan Jelenić from IHG. This trend is also economical, which makes them attractive to investors.  RELATED NEWS:center_img At the panel discussion “Sea side destinations – what is the product we are selling; the effect of Turkey, Greece and Tunisia coming back ”the panelists agreed that despite the challenges and the return of other markets, one cannot speak of a crisis, but of uncertain weather. Alfred Eeltink, “Hotel Facility Concepts,” explained that time savings and business effectiveness are influenced by the organization of work in the hotel itself and the design, primarily for maintenance, but ultimately for the cost of service. Technology can help, but still Eeltink warns that there are still jobs that people can do faster and better, which is why you need to choose carefully which technologies you want to use.  Hotels of the future will rely on technology to learn more about their guests and provide them with a personalized experience, said Manfred Kaiser, Regional Vice President of Oracle Hospitality at the beginning of the third panel of the second day of the Adria Forum Hotel.   “There are several reasons for this. Salaries are low until you get to a certain position. Generations have changed. Young people are not willing to sacrifice their time if they get a better offer. Hotels need to think about how to teach workers to be happy. It’s not all about the salary.”, Said Živorad Vasić, regional director of IHG.  AHF: EASTERN EUROPE IS GROWING, TOURIST INTEREST IS CHANGINGlast_img read more

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Miller sets out to conquer European retail park market

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Dominica Library and Information Service to host drug awareness sessions

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first_imgLocalNews Dominica Library and Information Service to host drug awareness sessions by: – January 13, 2012 Share 11 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring!center_img Share Tweet Photo credit: freetrans.gov.zaThe Library and Information Service, Roseau Public Library Division, in collaboration with the Drug Unit will host a day of educational sessions in celebration of Drug Awareness Month.On January 23, 2012 from 9:30 a.m to 1 p.m., students from the various secondary schools in the vicinity of Roseau together with the general public are invited to listen to drug enforcement officers as they educate listeners on;• Substance Abuse• Drug trafficking• Drug identificationThese sessions together with an exhibition will take place on the grounds of the Public Library.Drugs are everybody’s business and knowledge is power!!!!! So come join us!!!Press ReleaseDominica Library and Information Servicelast_img read more

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