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Audi scores 11th victory in 12 Hours of Sebring

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first_imgGerman manufacturer gets 11th win in 14 years SEBRING, Fla. – Audi continued its record of domination in Saturday’s Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring fueled by Fresh From Florida, scoring an impressive 1-2 finish to give the German marque 11 victories in the last 14 years.Marcel Fassler, Benoit Treluyer and Oliver Jarvis drove the year-old No. 1 Audi R18 e-tron Quattro, which won by 7.68 seconds over the No. 2 of Allan McNish, Tom Kristensen and Lucas DiGrassi – who were debuting a 2013-spec diesel-hybrid. Kristensen was seeking his seventh victory in the event, with McNish a four-time Sebring winner.The two Audis quickly pulled away and were never seriously challenged. Neel Jani, Nicolas Prost and Nick Heidfeld finished third in the No. 12 Rebellion Racing Lola B12/60, five laps down.Jarvis wrapped up a rare double, following up his GT class victory in the Rolex 24 At Daytona. He drove an Audi Sport Customer Racing/AJR Audi R8 in the GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series 2013 opener. It was his first time driving in either of the American endurance classics.Oliver Gavin, Tommy  Milner and Richard Westbrook took GT honors in the No. 4 Corvette C6 ZR1, winning by 2.7 seconds. Matteo Malucelli, Olivier Beretta and Gianmaria Bruni led much of the race in the No. 62 Risi Competizione Ferrari 458 Italia. Milner took the lead with 15 minutes remaining when Malucelli had an off-course venture in Turn 10, highlighting a charge back into contention after the team lost a lap due to electrical problems four hours into the race.The P2 race came down to a battle between teammates, with Level 5 Motorsports finishing 1-2. Team owner Scott Tucker drove in both cars, joining Marino Franchitti and Ryan Briscoe in the winning No. 151 HPD ARX-03b. Tucker, Ryan Hunter-Reay and Simon Pagenaud finished second in the team’s No. 152 entry, one lap behind. It was the fourth consecutive class victory at Sebring for both Level 5 and Tucker, tying the all-time record in the respective categories.David Ostella, David Cheng and Michael Guasch took the lead in the final half hour and held on the win the Prototype Challenge class in the No. 52 Oreca FLM09 fielded by PR1/Mathiasen Motorsports, winning by 15.80 seconds over the No. 8 of Kyle Marcelli, Chris Cumming and Stefan Johansson.Dion von Moltke became a 2013 double winner at Daytona and Sebring, joining Cooper MacNeil and Joeren Bleekemolen in winning GTC in the Alex Job Racing No. 22 Porsche 911 GT3. Von Moltke co-drove with Jarvis on Job’s winning Audi at Daytona. ___________________________________________________________________________________________We apologize. We are having technical issues with our comment sections and fan community and it is temporarily unavailable. We are actively working on these issues and hope to have it up and running soon. We are also working on enhancements to provide a better forum for our fans. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.last_img read more

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Watch Widespread Panic & Derek Trucks Jam Out On ‘Surprise Valley’ [Pro-Shot]

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first_imgEarlier this year, the BJCC in Birmingham, AL hosted two of the top tier touring Southern rock outfits in Widespread Panic and Tedeschi Trucks Band. Naturally, with that much star-power on one stage, let alone the Herring-Trucks family ties, it’s no surprise that the bands collaborated during the show’s final encore.The encore set started with Derek Trucks joining Panic on “Gimme,” followed by a rendition of “Surprise Valley.” Trucks wails on this fourteen-minute version, and his guitar interplay with Jimmy Herring and John Bell is on point. Not that that’s any surprise (valley)!Watch the new pro-shot video shared by Widespread Panic, as shot & edited by Andy Tennille and mixed by Brett Orrison.The full setlists from the show can be seen below.Setlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band at The BJCC, Birmingham, AL – 4/23/16Set: Made Up Mind, Laugh About It, Keep On Growing, Bird On A Wire, Idle Wind, Sticks and Stones, Bound For Glory, I Pity The Fool, Let Me Get By, Don’t Know What It Means, The LetterSetlist: Widespread Panic at The BJCC, Birmingham, AL – 4/23/16Set Ain’t Life Grand*, Weight of the World, Honky Red, Better Off, Proving Ground > Bust It Big, Sell Sell, Airplane > JAM > Papa’s Home > Drumz > Machine Gun Jam > Papa’s Home > Blackout Blues > Protein Drink > Sewing Machine (103 mins)Encore Gimme^ > Surprise Valley^, Me and The Devil^^, You Can’t Always Get What You Want^^^ (49 mins)* JB on Tiny Gitar (mandolin) / ^ Derek Trucks on Guitar / ^^ Derek Trucks on Guitar, Susan Tedeschi on Vocals & Guitar / ^^^ Susan Tedeschi on Vocals & Guitar, Derek Trucks on Guitar, Alecia Chakour & Mark Rivers on Vocalslast_img read more

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New Dickey Betts Dates Added With Son Duane Betts

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first_imgBack in December of 2017, Dickey Betts announced on his 74th birthday that he’d be returning to the road in 2018 after retiring three years ago. Since then, the founding member of the Allman Brothers Band has announced two performances headlining the beloved Peach Music Festival in July and Florida Jam in May.Now, Betts has extended his tour, adding four new dates across May and July. The new tour dates were announced by Alan Paul—the Allman Brothers Band’s biographer—on Facebook, along with the news that Duane Betts will join his father’s band for these newly announced performances.Ahead of Betts’ performance at Florida Jam on May 19th, he will perform at the Allman Brothers Band’s home base of Macon, Georgia, on May 17th. He will also perform three new dates in July, including Long Island Music Festival on July 15th, Connecticut’s Ridgefield Playhouse on July 20th, and Staten Island’s St. George Theater on July 22nd. He rounds out his announced tour dates with his set at Peach Music Festival in Scranton, Pennsylvania, on July 22nd.Dickey Betts Upcoming Tour DatesMay 17 Macon, GA—TBAMay 19 Boca Raton, FL—Sunset Cove AmphitheaterJuly 15 Long Island Music FestJuly 20 Ridgefield, CT—Ridgefield PlayhouseJuly 21 Staten Island, NY—St. George TheaterJuly 22 Scranton, PA—Peach Festlast_img read more

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The makeover of Mexico City

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first_imgMEXICO CITY — In a poem, Octavio Paz called the vast, colorful, ever-expanding metropolis of his birth “a paradise of cages.”It is, after all, a city where tenuous but imaginative informal housing sprouts amid the grid of formal architecture, a city where shanties, wash lines, and water tanks pop up on the rooftops of high-rent buildings. In greater Mexico City, home to 22 million people and covering 3,700 square miles, more than half of the architecture is built without regulations.Paz also wrote of a Mexico City that “in its circular fever repeats and repeats.” That image applies to the city’s traffic. In the central, historical heart called the distrito federal, or D.F. (pronounced “day-efay”), 9 million residents of 16 boroughs live in a 570-square-mile tangle of traffic. It’s riven day and night by cars, trucks, and microbuses — more than 3 million vehicles, a third of them more than 20 years old. For commuters on the outskirts of the D.F., congestion is so bad that the daily trip to work can take up to three hours.The same traffic contributes to air pollution. (“I am surrounded by city,” Paz wrote plaintively in another poem. “I lack air.”) In 1992, the United Nations called Mexico City’s air quality the planet’s worst, so bad that flying birds, overwhelmed, would fall dead from the sky. By 1998, the U.N. called Mexico City the world’s most dangerous city for children’s health.Thanks to stringent regulatory reform in the last two decades, the situation has dramatically improved. Air quality in Mexico City now resembles that in Los Angeles: not wonderful, but not catastrophic. New laws have reduced the city’s once prodigiously dirty industrial footprint, which had included lead smelters.The metropolitan area (41 municipalities outside the D.F. in the states of Mexico and Hidalgo) is in the Valley of Mexico. It constitutes the heart of a nation where “geography has been destiny,” said Jose Castillo, M.Arch. ’95, D.Des.’00. Castillo is a Mexico City architect and a lecturer at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD).That destiny includes volcanic mountains, which make the mile-high city dramatically beautiful, but also create air inversions that cloak it in trapped pollutants.And that destiny is both wet and fragile. Hundreds of years ago, Mexico City was a soggy maze of 45 rivers and five lakes atop an ancient volcano. The lakes mostly have been filled in, and the rivers have been covered by roadways. But subsoils still wiggle like Jell-O when an earthquake hits. (The biggest recent ones rattled through in 1985 and 1957.) In the same soils, pipework supplies city water, 35 percent of which is lost in transit.Urban challenges, Harvard initiativesProblematic housing, snarled traffic, and stubborn air pollution are three of the most prominent challenges in greater Mexico City, which is the largest metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere and the fifth-largest in the world. They are the same problems that threaten to overwhelm megacities worldwide. And they are problems that Harvard has a hand in studying and mitigating in Mexico City.Last year, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) started work on the Mexico City-Harvard Alliance for Air Quality and Health. The five-year, bi-national collaboration will study how well two decades of air quality regulation in Mexico have improved health and economic outcomes.Similarly, at GSD, long-term initiatives are investigating housing and traffic problems. Experts there see the growing city as a vast, mutating, proximate laboratory for studying the common challenges of megacities.In the last four years, GSD has picked up the pace on its Mexico studio courses, research fellowships, and summer and Wintersession offerings, which included one last month. Faculty members Felipe Correa and Carlos Garciavelez Alfaro published “Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography” (2014), a study of how the capital gradually took shape as an urban center starting 600 years ago, when it was the heart of the Aztec world.“Mexico City as a megacity can serve as a universal paradigm that cities should learn from in the future,” said Castillo, a point the new book also makes. “The allure of the megalopolis becomes very appealing as an object of study.”One GSD program is the Mexican Cities Initiative, launched in 2013 to study urban vulnerabilities and innovations. Its faculty coordinator is urban development expert Diane Davis, the Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and Urbanism. She wrote “Urban Leviathan: Mexico City in the Twentieth Century” (1994) about the political and economic complexities of urbanization.At GSD, Davis co-directs an initiative on sustainable urban development through the lens of “social” (affordable) housing, along with sustainable-cities expert Ann Forsyth, a professor of urban planning. Forsyth is director of GSD’s masters program in urban planning, an expert in planning methodologies and tools, and a blogger for Planetizen, an urban planning news and education site.The sustainable urban development initiative at GSD is funded by Mexico’s National Worker Housing agency, Infonavit, a government-run mortgage bank established in 1972 to aid production of low-income housing. Infonavit is administered through a tripartite system, with equal participation from private-sector employers, labor, and the federal government. Workers pay into the mortgage fund through salary deductions, the private sector builds the housing, and labor has a voice in the process.In 1992, the United Nations called Mexico City’s air quality the planet’s worst. Today, the air quality in Mexico City now resembles that in Los Angeles: not wonderful, but not catastrophic. Ned Brown/Harvard StaffSmart housingPaz was 15 in 1929, the year that some experts say marked Mexico City’s transformation from a sedate corner of Hispanic culture — a locale central to the poet’s nostalgia — to a booming metropolis. During Paz’s boyhood, Mexico nationalized its railroads. It was a time of industrial growth, land reform, and the new oil economy. The era also spurred the poet’s oblique obsessions, including the fate of housing that Paz equated with beauty, tradition, and the safety of a village.In Mexico City’s D.F., housing is a big challenge. At least 40,000 units a year are needed, and half of them must be in the affordable category. But only 20,000 a year get built. This housing deficiency has an ironic counterpoint: There are abundant units of abandoned housing. Most were built on cheap land on the far outskirts of the D.F., but ended up being unsustainable culturally. They were too far from workplaces and poorly connected to rapid transit.Part of the Infonavit-funded project is within GSD’s executive education program, directed by Rena Fonseca, Ph.D. ’91. Her office is less than a year into a three-year cycle of programs on affordable housing in Mexico, building connections with Infonavit’s executives. Insiders call the goal “capacity building,” which Castillo said creates “an ecology of knowledge” connecting Harvard with housing experts in Mexico. Last month, an executive education advance team was in Mexico City preparing for a May event at Infonavit.With $60 billion in affordable-housing loans outstanding, Infonavit controls 70 percent of such mortgages in Mexico, co-finances 15 percent of the rest, and underwrites about 500,000 new loans a year. One in four Mexicans lives in an Infonavit-financed house. (Affordable-housing units have an average price tag of $30,000.)Infonavit is also the largest mortgage holder in Latin America, with 5.5 million loans on its books. “That’s a big number,” said Sebastián Fernández Cortina, one of three controlling directors at Infonavit, where he represents private-sector interests. With size comes responsibility as well as opportunity. “Mexico City has grown exponentially,” he said, explaining the need for the nation’s chief test case for the resilient, sustainable urban housing of the future. “We need to do this in very organized ways.”Population growth adds to the pressure for new housing. At present, much of what gets built is informal; no architects need apply. Visible from any high vantage in Mexico City is what megacity watchers call “the urban tsunami.” Clay-colored waves of informal housing seem to lap higher onto the mountains that enclose the city like the rim of a vast bowl.There are 825 informal settlements in greater Mexico City, with some sweeping up into the hillsides. Up close, in one such hillside area, the D.F. below shimmers like Oz, spiked with skyscrapers and organized around straight boulevards. Paseo de la Reforma is one, its curbs lined with the same species of trees as its model, the Champs-Élysées in Paris. The hillside settlement is no Paris, but its unpaved streets are charmingly crooked and narrow and its housing, no higher than a few stories, colorful and individual. The city below, though, with its promising jobs, is hard to get to.Drawing those waves of housing back toward the city center is central to the GSD/Infonavit initiative. Design experts such as Davis and Castillo call this “re-densifying,” that is, repopulating urban centers in ways that shorten commutes, save energy, create attractive high-density housing, and reduce social strains.Before the Harvard collaboration, in 2008, Infonavit had already shifted its focus to “green” mortgages. These require that buildings support social good and a clean environment. By 2011, all Infonavit mortgages were required to be green, and included provisions for community-building and environmentally sustainable standards for electricity, gas, and water.“Urban development that is not well planned has a high cost in the future,” said Cortina, who attended a 2006 executive education program at Harvard Business School (HBS). That cost could include failing to respond to climate change and failing to provide attractive housing for Mexico’s young people. Financing housing “in a much smarter way,” he said, means “housing not only for people to live in, but places where people grow.”“Places where people grow” sums up Infonavit’s emphasis on housing that guarantees not only good infrastructure, but a chance at building community.A year ago, Paulina Campos, M.P.P. ’07, took up that challenge as CEO of an Infonavit-founded nonprofit whose mission is community-building at affordable-housing complexes. “It’s not just about physical space,” said Campos, who has an office at Infonavit’s dramatically modern headquarters in Mexico City. “It’s about taking responsibility.”In the end, she said, the appearance, safety, and social cohesion of social hosing is in the hands of its residents, who are often faced with starting life over in housing that cannot match the village-like atmosphere of informal housing.“As a country, we have developed the capacity to build houses massively,” said Campos, who works closely with Cortina. “But in the end it’s not complete without building communities.” Without the right social dynamics, affordable housing can slip into decline. Maintenance is slack, neighbors don’t interact, and security is sketchy. With a sense of community, residents share common goals, organize soccer leagues, and schedule cleanup days. “This is social capital,” said Campos.Social capital, by way of housing, is hard to recover or even maintain. Late one afternoon last fall, Castillo took guests on a roadway tour of the city, talking as he steered through traffic, down grand boulevards that gave way to four-lane streets bordering vast boroughs set aside for residents without much money. East of the D.F.’s grand core, he gestured to the right, toward Iztapalapa, a borough of 2 million and the poorest in the city, where it is hard to find potable water and where about a quarter of the homes still have damage from the 1985 earthquake. “This is part of the drama of the city,” said Castillo. To the left is another poor borough of 2 million.Castillo pulled over and parked and stood by one of the subway stops that his firm, arquitectura 911sc, had designed. The landscaping had devolved to dried tall grass and discarded bottles. In the growing dark, on an ill-lit patch of remote Mexico City, microbuses glided past without headlights and boys gathered to skateboard.The next day the wiry architect sprang up a set of stairs at Integrara Zaragoza, an affordable-housing complex his firm also had designed. (The firm employs 24 and has about 40 projects underway.) From the rooftop, Castillo pointed to the urban tendrils creeping up the distant foothills. But then he pointed closer, to the street, where the informal city was on display, “the public life external to the home,” he said: food stands, shops at the curb, and soccer games on the street.Typical affordable housing can discourage the social genius of the informal sector, he said. Often, it even follows a socially destructive pattern. Tiny courtyards discourage social gathering or the possibility of plantings or gardens. A crush of parking places outside the buildings eliminates precious public space.But in this development — the third designed by his firm, with 640 units on a former industrial site — there are spacious courtyards with handsome plantings. Parking is a half-level down from the first floor (“We hide all the cars,” said Castillo), and condo-like dwellings are small (ranging from 400 to 560 square feet) but flexibly designed to accommodate the needs of small families as well as students and single workers. “The diversity of the demographics,” he said, “has to be reflected in the typologies in the buildings.”This housing is close to transportation, 100 meters from a subway line and 300 meters from a modern Metrobús line. And the housing project is dense: about 500 units per 2.5 acres. The aim, said Castillo, is “as many units as possible without overcrowding.” (An American suburb has 12 to 24 units in the same space.) Such urban compression, in neighborhoods reclaimed from the industrial past, and with design strategies that reclaim social capital, like the hidden parking and first-floor room for village-scale retail, “is a revolution,” Castillo said.Campos was still at Infonavit in the spring of 2013 when Cortina, Davis, Fonseca, and Eric S. Belsky signed a letter of intent with Infonavit to create the Harvard initiative, which Campos called a think tank on sustainable urban planning and affordable housing. (Belsky, now at the Federal Reserve Board, was then managing director at Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies and a GSD lecturer in urban planning.) “That’s how the Harvard idea started,” she said.As she talked, Campos stood atop Infonavit’s headquarters on the largest green roof in Latin America. Employees jog there at lunchtime and harvest greens and vegetables in a hothouse they planted. From the roof, Campos had a 360-degree view of the growing city, including its streams of endless traffic. As for social strains in housing, she said, “long commutes make a big difference.”Smart transportationIn Mexico City, only 26 percent of commuters use personal cars. Others use city-subsidized modern buses, painted a proud, bright red, in a five-line system with 65 miles of routes. Some commuters hop on handsome, low-fare trolley cars of pale green. Millions of daily commuters board the city’s efficient subways, which are routinely quicker from point to point than a car. But none of these transportation systems are growing fast enough to meet demand.Harvard is trying to help reduce commutes and promote alternatives. Davis directs another GSD initiative called “Transforming Urban Transport,” TUT to insiders, funded by the Volvo Research and Education Foundations. The idea is to use case study research to see how political leadership aids innovations in transportation. “Mobility is political,” said Castillo. “It’s not just a technical problem.”One of the case studies is Mexico City, said Onesimo Flores Dewey, senior researcher at TUT and a GSD lecturer in urban planning and design. During the 1970s, when Mexico was flush with new oil money, he said, “There was a flurry of investment in public transportation.” But it was never enough to keep up. In Mexico City, 60 percent of commuters still depend on informal (and unregulated and polluting) microbuses. The reason is simple: Poor residents living farthest from the D.F. need access to transport that has informal stops and flexible routes.Things are changing for the better, said Castillo. Modern, low-polluting buses with official routes are gradually replacing microbuses and displacing cars. On six-lane roads once devoted to automobiles, two lanes are reserved now for bus traffic, “a new form of equity,” he said.One day last fall, Mexico City urban planner Laura Janka, M.A.U.D. ’11, peered at her native city through a chain-link fence atop the 47-story Torre Latinoamerica, or Latin-American Tower. Traffic glittered in silvery streams below, along wide avenues that radiated in spokes toward the mountains. Long commutes not only add to pollution, they tear at the social fabric, she said.The traffic represents a clash of two cities, said Janka, one of 9 million people in the D.F. and another of 5 million commuters from the enormous encircling periphery. The D.F.’s budget for water, power, transportation, and parks is enough to cover 9 million, not 14 million, she said, “but we have to share it.”Sharing of another kind reduces traffic congestion. Some Mexico City streets now have one lane for pedestrians and one for cars, as on 16 September Avenue. “I love this street,” said Rodrigo Díaz, who studied with Davis when she was at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Chile-born architect and urban planner is an expert on urban land use who prefers the trolley for travel in Mexico City. Once at Infonavit, he now works for EMBARQ México, a Mexican nonprofit that developed a bus rapid-transit corridor that links road to rail.Díaz showed visitors an even more radical recipe for reducing urban car congestion. Calle Francisco I. Madero, once choked with cars, is now a perambulatory corridor for 200,000 pedestrians a day. At one end is the Zócalo, a vast central square that has been the political and spiritual heart of Mexico since Aztec times. At the other end is the city’s busiest intersection, its oldest park, and the towering Torre Latinoamerica.Another strategy involves EcoBici, a bicycle-sharing system, the largest in Latin America, said GSD’s Flores Dewey. It draws close to a half a million riders a month and grew 60 percent in 2014. (Membership, heavily subsidized by the city, costs $30 a year.)The user demographics defied expectations. “Public transportation is for people who can’t afford a car,” said Díaz. “But not EcoBici.” Eighty percent of its members are male, and many of them young, but that is changing too. He passed a bike-share rack near a subway stop. There was one bicycle left.Nearby, four streets of traffic hem in the treeless Zócalo, where on hot days visitors stand in a line in the narrow shade cast by the central flagpole. But at the plaza’s periphery, another lesson is at hand from Mexico’s informal sector, which tends to fill in sidewalks and public spaces in creative ways. The city has taken over part of official streets and created pocket parks, islands of benches and greenery, “Twelve in the last two years,” said Díaz. “If you come at noon, it’s hard to find a seat.”The same willingness to learn from the informal sector may be the keystone of urban resilience in Mexico City, where the cultures of rich and poor, formal and informal, seem to clash fruitfully. To get the modern Metrobús system started, city officials negotiated with microbus owners to form cooperatives that buy and run bigger buses. To invent a system of pocket parks, city officials drew on informal sector habits of taking over streets in search of human scale.In a city that is still, underneath, a place of “lakes and volcanoes,” said Castillo, resilience and adaption is built into the culture. The city grew up around first an Aztec and then a Hispanic colonial core. It absorbed forests, lakes, and villages. It burst into modernity at the same time that Paz was putting boyhood behind him. The Nobelist would go on to call his changed city “a subverted paradise.” But Harvard and its design experts and city residents see hope and progress.“What do we do with this reality?” asked Castillo of his complicated city, with its rough road to its present. “We can’t relocate 21 million people. We can’t spend our lives whining about the bad decisions we have made. We have to actively adapt.”last_img read more

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SMC to hold social work week

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first_imgTo inform, to learn and to volunteer — those are the goals of Saint Mary’s Social Work Week. This week, the Social Work Department will highlight its diverse field of study with various events held each day, including a speech today by Laura Recio, a registered play therapist supervisor of Counseling Solution in Spes Unica at 9:30 a.m. The importance of social work week has its grounding in teaching students about what they can achieve with a social work degree. “Students learn that they can work in diverse settings, including hospitals, medical centers, schools, congressional offices, mental health centers, colleges and businesses,” Dr. Frances Kominkiewicz, director of the Social Work program, said. However, the week benefits all students, not just Social Work majors. “Social work is essential in the way we live our lives today. Typically people link social workers to Child Protective Services and Welfare offices, but social workers are everywhere, and their positions can be found under almost every career heading,” Alma Bravo, a junior Social Work major, said, Wednesday, students can learn how to de-stress with a lesson in origami art in the Saint Mary’s Student Center atrium from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, Becky Ruvalcaba, the executive director of South Bend’s LaCasa de Amistad will speak from noon to 1 p.m. in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall. According to Kominkiewicz, LaCasa de Amistad is a non-profit organization that provides services to the Hispanic community. Friday wraps up the week with a breakfast outside of the Social Work suite on the second floor of Spes Unica from 9:30 to 11 a.m., and a speech on Gerontology by Andrea Verteramo in conference rooms A and B of the Noble Family Dining Hall at noon, Kominkiewicz said. According to Leonard Sanchez, professor of Specialist and Social Work, the events have something for everyone. “There’s a social worker in everybody,” Sanchez said. “Human relations, integrity, competence — it’s what our department is about, but it goes beyond that. We show how to give to each other and the community.” Sanchez said the week is being held to encourage people to take action within the little time they have at Saint Mary’s. “Four years may seem like a long time to the students, but it flies,” Sanchez said. “We teach that everyone can make a difference in the world, even if only a small difference. We aren’t trying to change the world all at once — just our little piece of South Bend.” Sanchez said he hopes to show students they can make a difference, and that their “presence counts.” “People want to do something, they just don’t know how. Social work week bridges that impossible gap,” Sanchez said. Kominkiewicz said the importance of the event is for all students, but for the first years especially. “First-year students find that they learn a great deal about Social Work as a major and as a profession. Feedback indicates that social work week was most helpful to them in deciding to become a social work major,” Kominkiewicz said. All students are encouraged to attend the week’s events in an effort “to make Saint Mary’s stronger in the community,” Sanchez said. “It’s the little things you do for others that moves mountains.”last_img read more

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Josh Grisetti & Alli Mauzey Will Star in Red Eye of Love Off-Broadway

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first_img Featuring music by Sam Davis and a book and lyrics by John Wulp and the late Arnold Weinstein, Red Eye of Love pits a young idealist against a jaded materialist whose department store only sells one product: meat. The two compete for the affection of the same girl against the backdrop of the Great Depression. The tuner is based on an original play by Weinstein, which premiered in 1961. Wulp and Weinstein first began to adapt Weinstein’s play into a musical in the ‘80s. Sperling helmed a reading of the show as part of The Eugene O’Neill Theater Center’s National Music Theater Conference in 2007, which at the time featured music by Jan Warner. Last year, the musical received its world premiere in North Haven with Davis as composer. Grisetti’s stage credits including Broadway Bound on Broadway and the off-Broadway productions of Peter and the Starcatcher, Rent, Enter Laughing and After the Ball. Mauzey most recently appeared on Broadway as Glinda in Wicked; her additional credits include Cry-Baby and Hairspray on Broadway and It’s a Bird…It’s a Plan…It’s Superman with City Center Encores!. Pariseau has appeared on the New York stage previously in Legally Blonde, The Explorers Club, I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change and Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh. Broadway alums Josh Grisetti and Alli Mauzey will lead the cast of the new musical Red Eye of Love off-Broadway. Grisetti will star as Wilmer and Mauzey will play Selma. Joining them will be Kevin Pariseau as O.O. Martinas. The New York premiere, directed by Tony winner Ted Sperling, begins previews at the Dicapo Opera Theatre on August 27 and run through September 28. Opening night is set for September 4. Red Eye of Love will feature choreography by Lainie Sakakura and Alex Sanchez, set design by Robert Indiana, costumes by Martha Bromelmeier, lighting design by Matthew Richards and projection design by David Wilson. In addition to Mauzey, Grisetti and Pariseau, the cast will include Dylan Boyd, Katie Chung, Patch David, Daniel Lynn Evans, Tracie Franklin, Katie Hagen and Daniel May. View Commentslast_img read more

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Río Magdalena Mágico II Day, Serving the Colombian Community

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first_imgBy Yolima Dussán/Diálogo May 31, 2017 When residents of communities living along the Magdalena River learn of the arrival of the ARC Golfo de Urabá amphibious landing vessel, they know the Colombian Navy is coming to see them. Hundreds of men, women, and children living in extreme poverty sense imminent solutions to their problems – physical and mental health, counseling, nutrition, recreation and sometimes even affection. They’re not wrong. Armed with solutions, 21 crewmembers and 27 specialists on board the ARC Golfo de Urabá set sail from Cartagena on March 23rd for the start of Río Magdalena Mágico II Day. Organized by the Colombian Navy, the crew carrying several metric tons of essential goods was to visit six towns in the Canal del Dique area for 10 days of development support. Greater frequency, presence, and better results Río Magdalena Mágico II came into existence in 2015. “Always with the goal of giving a boost to the neediest communities, we decided to join forces with the Foundation for the Research and Development of Special Education (FIDES, per its Spanish acronym), to benefit children with cognitive disabilities. Now we are leading this campaign, which we are doing for the second time. We expanded services and coverage for the riverine populations that have major needs,” Vice Admiral Evelio Ramírez Gáfaro, commander of the Caribbean Naval Force of the Colombian Navy told Diálogo. With close to 15,000 members, this force operates in a maritime jurisdiction of 589,560 square kilometers, 1,600 kilometers of coastline and 1,700 kilometers of rivers. It also deploys resources and troops on almost 15,000 square kilometers of land, mainly in the Montes de María area, in the center of Colombia’s Atlantic coast. Armed with a high-impact program, this force looks forward to expanding the development days to the entire region and provide solutions more consistently. “Like what we do in La Guajira, where we go every 40 days. The goal is to have more presence, to go more frequently, and have better results in these forgotten communities,” Vice Adm. Ramírez added. Assets for prosperity “During these [10] days, there were 554 internal medicine, 490 pediatric, and 258 dental consultations. Seven metric tons of humanitarian aid were distributed. Cultural activities and sporting events brought people together in a type of carnival where for several nights movies were shown under the stars,” Captain Nicolás Guzmán, head of the Integral Action Department of the Colombian Navy’s Caribbean Naval Force, told Diálogo. He is responsible for the workings of the development support campaigns in this jurisdiction. Río Magdalena Mágico II navigated along Canal del Dique, arriving in the towns of San Cristóbal, Robles, San Agustín, San Luis, Tenerife, Tacamocho, and finally ending up in Monpox, southeast of Cartagena. “In every town we visited we delivered ‘Assets for prosperity,’ or items seized by the National Directorate of Taxes that we hope to use for the benefit of the poorest families,” explained Capt. Guzmán. This event, categorized as a large-scale activity, was in the works for more than three months. The medical assistance benefitted more than 1,400 people, and they were able to do strong work with teenagers to prevent unplanned pregnancies. A message of hope Both Río Magdalena Mágico II and the first version held in October 2016 emphasized care for children with cognitive disabilities. This voyage arose out of the work that FIDES does with children who have trouble acquiring or expressing their social skills and knowledge and their families. “[It was] exceptional work that began in Cartagena, and that one day we decided to expand to the municipalities of Bolívar. That was how Río Magdalena Mágico I was born. The care provided to these populations was very valuable, and it especially inspired us to continue and broaden our goals to increase health care coverage to the entire community,” Vice Adm. Ramírez said. “The situation of the towns visited during this trip is one of true need. It is very hard to describe the living conditions of these Colombians. Extreme poverty and neglect define their reality. So that’s why the aid campaign led by the Colombian Navy is a message of hope on a large scale,” Doctor Alejandro Escallón Lloreda, director of FIDES, told Diálogo. He hopes to include children from these areas in the Special Olympics. “The support and organization of the Colombian Navy during this trip was an example, from a logistical point of view. The men of the Navy took on this work with great generosity, and their goals were reached thanks to the fact that everything was so well organized and difficulties solved. Their commitment to the community, to the mission, goes beyond their military orders. Everyone works long days with extreme willpower, dedication, and care for the disabled children and for the community in general, which is sometimes surprised at the presence of a contingent of civilian and military personnel who travel from far away to help them,” Escallón stressed. Awaiting Río Magdalena Mágico III Countless children and adults who had never been seen by a doctor received health care services. Movies were shown for the first time in towns that had never had recreational activities, and families with cognitively disabled children who had never received guidance on how to integrate them into society received counseling for the first time. The experience also left an imprint in the minds of those who participated in the voyage: Men, women, young adults, and children along the river’s coast waved Colombian flags to say goodbye. For them, seeing the Colombian Navy’s ARC Golfo de Urabá vessel on the Magdalena River represents the hope that Colombia won’t forget about them.last_img read more

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6 ways to help ensure members’ security

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first_imgTo hack an online account, you need a password. Wrong. Today’s tech-savvy hackers have found a way around the pesky task of hunting down login credentials – using cookies.In the online world, cookies do not refer to sugary confections best eaten with milk. Instead, cookies are sequences of letters and numbers your computer stores. Think of the times you’ve seen a “Remember me” box on a login page. By checking that box, you’re asking your computer to keep track of cookies.Fraud Prevention Manager at CO-OP Ashley McAlpine says the beauty of cookies – from a user experience at least– is their ability to let you bypass repeated logins. That’s also what hackers love about them. Through reverse engineering, hackers can re-create cookies to trick websites into automatically logging them in. Then they have free rein to explore an account for as long as they want. continue reading » 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Protesters set fire to Wendy’s in Atlanta where black man was slain by police

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first_img“I do not believe that this was a justified use of deadly force and have called for the immediate termination of the officer,” Bottoms said at an afternoon news conference. Authorities have not yet released the names of the two officers involved in the shooting, both of whom were white.Brooks was the father of a young daughter who was celebrating her birthday on Saturday, his lawyers said. His death from a police bullet came after more than two weeks of demonstrations in major cities across the United States in the name of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died on May 25 under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer.Street protests broke out in Atlanta on Saturday near the scene of the shooting, with more than 100 people calling for the officers to be charged criminally in the case.THIS JUST HAPPENED IN ATLANTA, AT THE WENDYS ON UNIVERSITY. TWO WHITE OFFICERS KILLED A BLACK MAN!!!! FUCK THE POLICE!!!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/vlFP4Y8M71— ANNZ💋 (@ANNANTS1) June 13, 2020Police were called to the Wendy’s over reports that Brooks had fallen asleep in the drive-thru line. Officers attempted to take him into custody after he failed a field sobriety test, according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. Protesters shut down a major highway in Atlanta on Saturday and set fire to a Wendy’s restaurant where a black man was shot by police as he tried to escape arrest, an incident caught on video and sure to fuel more nationwide demonstrations.The unrest broke out after dark in Atlanta, where earlier in the day Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said she had accepted the prompt resignation of police chief Erika Shields over the death on Friday night of 27-year-old Rayshard Brooks at the Wendy’s.Images on local television showed the restaurant in flames, with no fire crews on the scene. Other demonstrators marched onto Interstate-75, where they were met by police.The Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by police is now on fire.Protests are happening in Atlanta right now. ⁦@ABC7⁩ pic.twitter.com/8FuuGhVc59— Veronica Miracle (@ABC7Veronica) June 14, 2020 Video shot by a bystander captures Brooks struggling with two officers on the ground outside the Wendy’s before breaking free and running across the parking lot with what appears to be a police TASER in his hand.A second videotape from the restaurant’s cameras shows Brooks turning as he runs and possibly aiming the TASER at the pursuing officers before one of them fires his gun and Brooks falls to the ground.Brooks ran the length of about six cars when he turned back toward an officer and pointed what he had in his hand at the policeman, said Vic Reynolds, director of the GBI at a separate press conference.”At that point, the Atlanta officer reaches down and retrieves his weapon from his holster, discharges it, strikes Mr. Brooks there on the parking lot and he goes down,” Reynolds said.Lawyers representing the family of Brooks told reporters that Atlanta police had no right to use deadly force even if he had fired the TASER, a non-lethal weapon, in their direction.”You can’t shoot somebody unless they are pointing a gun at you,” attorney Chris Stewart said.Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard, Jr., said in an emailed statement that his office “has already launched an intense, independent investigation of the incident” while it awaits the findings of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.Bottoms said Shields, a white woman appointed chief in December 2016, would be replaced by deputy chief Rodney Bryant, a black man who will serve as interim chief.Topics :last_img read more

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