first_imgWe got demos of two games. The first was a new version of Pilot Wings, which was a bit difficult to master, but did give a definite sense of how the 3D technology looks while playing on a large plane. The device has three cameras–one on the inside (like its predecessor) and two on the outside for shooting 3D photos. The second, an augmented reality demo (an early version of a game that will ship with the system), takes full advantage of the system’s built-in gyroscope and accelerometer. The game requires you to walk around and crouch in order to blast targets that are overlayed on the image picked up by the camera.All in all, we’re really excited to see this thing hit the market. More coverage of the device and our meeting coming later today. Nintendo’s 3DS was, hands down, the biggest thing at last year’s E3. Unfortunately, we didn’t really get a lot of hands-on time with the glasses-free portable gaming device. Nintendo gave us a minute or two with the thing at E3, but it didn’t actually have any games to demo.So, naturally, when Nintendo America president Reggie Fils-Aime asked if we’d be interested in getting some real, hands-on, game-playing time with the device, we jumped at the opportunity.The device really does look and feel like a Nintendo DSi–that is, until it fires up. The top screen is 3D. Unlike those glasses based technologies that have images spring toward you, the 3DS really offers a sense of depth. It takes a few moments for your eyes to adjust to it–especially the first time–but once used to it, it’s really immersive. The round controller that sits above the d-pad is not, as we expected, there to change viewing angles. Rather it’s a more finely tuned controller for gameplay.last_img