first_img Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter OAKLAND — From his position behind Dylan Bundy, Andrelton Simmons saw something pretty impressive.“He looked like Greg Maddux out there,” the Angels shortstop said after Bundy pitched 6 2/3 innings in a 4-1 victory over the Oakland A’s in his Angels’ debut Saturday afternoon.“He was hitting his spots and making his pitches. Everything was working. He had guys swinging and missing by a lot, so he looked really good to me.”Manager Joe Maddon said Bundy was “outstanding,” after the right-hander pounded the strike zone with all his pitches, working efficiently and never really getting in trouble. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img Buttrey got the final out of the eighth, and then Robles worked a perfect ninth, after being charged with the winning runs in Friday’s 10-inning loss.“When a guy’s had a tough day the day before, you want to get him back there as quickly as you possibly can,” Maddon said. “It’s really tough to permit it to fester and sit on it too long, so both Ty and Robles had much better days today. And they will probably both be off tomorrow, but that’s OK. They got their mojo back.” “It’s hard to hit a ball with a round bat, so the more strikes you throw, the better the advantage you’ll have,” Bundy said. “It felt like later in the game I was starting to get behind in the counts, I had to work my way back into a few. But for the most part, it felt good throwing strikes, and trying to stay on the attack, especially when you got the offense we do and they put a run on the board.”Bundy retired the first eight hitters. The A’s didn’t get anyone into scoring position until the fifth, when Robbie Grossman stole second after he was hit by a pitch. Bundy didn’t allow an extra-base hit until Stephen Piscotty’s double that chased him out of the game in the seventh.Bundy struck out seven and walked none. He threw 90 pitches, leaving with no runs on the board, but Keynan Middleton allowed a single to drive in the only run.When Middleton entered, he had a four-run lead, thanks mostly to one big inning against Sean Manaea.The A’s left-hander was breezing until Upton drilled a homer just off the top of the left-field fence in the fourth.In the fifth, Taylor Ward and Max Stassi singled. Simmons pulled a double down the left-field line to drive in one, and David Fletcher doubled off the left-field fence to knock in two more.Those were all the runs the Angels got, and the bullpen made the lead hold up. Buttrey, who blew an eighth-inning one-run lead on Friday, worked a scoreless eighth.Buttrey gave up back-to-back hits to start the inning, but got A’s star Matt Chapman to hit into a double play. It would have been a routine double play, but Simmons bobbled the ball, which forced La Stella to rush the turn as Ramon Laureano was bearing down on him.“I thanked him for picking me up right there,” Simmons said.Related Articles Along with a Justin Upton homer, clutch bounceback performances by relievers Ty Buttrey and Hansel Robles, and a lightning-quick double-play turn by Tommy La Stella, the Angels were able to rebound from a tough 10-inning loss in the opener Friday.“Give our guys a lot of credit, on the road under these circumstances,” Maddon said. “These are the kind of moments to look for to start building that culture and character among the group. It was outstanding.”Bundy was the star, though.The Angels got him from the Baltimore Orioles in a trade that was not well received by many Angels fans. They saw a career 4.67 ERA, a number that belied his one-time status as a top prospect. The Angels had hoped Bundy, still just 27, could still have a breakthrough, especially getting out of the hitter-friendly ballparks of the American League East.In his first start with the Angels, Bundy rather easily dispatched a solid A’s lineup. The key was getting ahead in the count, which pitching coach Mickey Callaway has preached. Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros last_img