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Archives for: December 31, 2020

Supply chain bottlenecks may slow U.S. wind installations

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:While the U.S. wind energy installation outlook looks bright — more than 23 gigawatts in new capacity forecast over the next two years — looming unforeseen supply chain bottlenecks could lead to project cancellations and postponements. This could put as much as $2.1 billion of revenue at risk, according to a new study by Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.“Between 2019 and 2020, we anticipate strong growth in wind energy installations as the industry rushes to meet deadlines for U.S. Production Tax Credits (PTCs),” said Dan Shreve, head of global wind research at Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables. “However, increased demand for transportation capacity due to growth in partial repowering activity, logistics requirements, and competition from other industrial sectors could severely hamper the transportation segment’s ability to ship components.”Shreve added: “These supply chain constraints will escalate deployment risks for all wind energy participants — increasing the likelihood of higher costs, missed deadlines, lost production, and fewer PTCs if projects can’t be commissioned in time.”According to the analysis, if these supply chain constraint issues are not addressed, more than 23 percent of the wind energy capacity installations expected in 2019-2020 could be delayed or canceled.Moreover, turbine installations could decline by 1.1 gigawatts — 366 megawatts in 2019, 720 megawatts in 2020 — representing a loss of more than $800 million in turbine sales. PTC impacts, while more complex to estimate, could represent lost revenue of up to $1.3 billion over the 10-year tax credit period.More: Looming supply chain crunch threatens US wind energy boom Supply chain bottlenecks may slow U.S. wind installationslast_img read more

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Scottish Power to add solar, battery storage to existing wind farms

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first_imgScottish Power to add solar, battery storage to existing wind farms FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Scottish Power plans to squeeze more renewable electricity from its onshore windfarms by covering the ground beside the turbines with photovoltaic panels and batteries. The wind power firm has applied for permission to build its first solar power projects beneath the blades of its existing windfarms in Cornwall, Lancashire and Coldham.Scottish Power says it hopes to include solar panels in the vast majority of its future onshore windfarms across Scotland and Ireland, depending on whether the ground conditions are suitable for panels.Keith Anderson, Scottish Power’s chief executive, said: “Every green megawatt of electricity will be crucial if we stand any chance of hitting net zero in 2050. This means squeezing the absolute maximum potential out of every clean energy project that we consider.”The company’s renewable energy division has considered almost 100 sites in Scotland and Ireland for a new breed of windfarm that uses fewer powerful turbines and can be fitted with solar panels and batteries. In some cases, adding 10MW panels and 10MW of energy storage could double the green energy capacity of small windfarm sites.Scottish Power is developing more than 1,000MW of new onshore wind capacity, however the U.K. will need to build at least this capacity of onshore wind every year for the next three decades if it hopes to meet its 2050 climate targets, according to the Committee on Climate Change.Anderson said: “In the next 18 months I believe hybrids will be the new normal for all renewable energy developers.” [Jillian Ambrose]More: Scottish Power plans to build solar panels beside windfarmslast_img read more

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BNEF: Wind and solar cheaper than new gas or coal in two-thirds of the world

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:Solar photovoltaic (PV) and onshore wind projects currently have the cheapest levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) of all new-build generation for at least two-thirds of the world population, according to the latest analysis by BloombergNEF (BNEF).In gas-importing regions, such as Europe, China or Japan, battery storage is now cheaper compared to other new-build peaker plants.The global benchmark LCOE for onshore wind dropped by 9% to USD 44 (EUR 40.6) per MWh since the second half of 2019. For fixed-axis utility-scale PV systems, it went down 4% to USD 50/MWh in the same period, BNEF figures show.At USD 150/MWh, the benchmark LCOE for battery storage with a four-hour duration came down by about half compared to two years ago.The downward trend for all three technologies has been observed in all major markets across the world. For onshore wind, the competitive edge is mainly owed to improvements in turbine capacity, which now averages 4.1 MW, and a cost of around USD 700,000 per MW for recently financed projects.[Sladjana Djunisic]More: Solar, onshore wind and storage keep getting cheaper – BNEF BNEF: Wind and solar cheaper than new gas or coal in two-thirds of the worldlast_img read more

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Indian Railways to use its surplus land to install 20GW of new renewable energy capacity

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first_imgIndian Railways to use its surplus land to install 20GW of new renewable energy capacity FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Saur Energy International:The Indian Railways is planning to use its surplus land to generate 20 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy from ‘Made in India’ solar or wind equipment to power its network, Union Minister of Commerce, Industry and Railways Piyush Goyal has said. Further adding that the Indian Railways will be a 100 percent electricity-driven rail network in the coming years which would make it the largest such network in the world.While addressing a virtual programme on ‘Powering Livelihoods: Transforming India’s Rural Economy with Clean Energy Solutions’ hosted by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), Goyal said that the Railways’ surplus land along the tracks is going to be utilised for generating renewable energy from indigenous equipment.“We plan to use a lot of our surplus land and land along the tracks to generate 20 GW (gigawatts)…’Made in India’ solar or wind equipment being used to give us 20 GW production capacity of renewable energy and enough kWh to power our entire railway,” Goyal said.The railways may need to either expand battery storage or other forms of storage for this, he added.Along the same lines in July, the Railway Energy Management Company Limited (REMCL) – a JV of the Ministry of Railways and RITES Ltd, had issued a tender on behalf of the Indian Railways for setting up of 1 GW ground-mounted solar power plants on railway land along the railway tracks pan India. The tender is still open and the last date for submission of responses to the Request for Qualification (RFQ) and the Request for Proposal (RfP) is September 2, 2020.The scope of work for the selected project developers will broadly include the design, build, finance, operation, long– term maintenance and transfer of assets for solar PV project and the supply of electricity to Railways under long-term fixed-rate PPA.[Ayush Verma]More: Railways planning to generate 20 GW renewable energy on surplus land: Goyallast_img read more

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Unforgettable

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first_imgThe Blue Sky Fund takes kids from Richmond’s low-income neighborhoods on a variety of outdoor excursions.It isn’t easy getting inner-city kids out of their comfort zone, but that hasn’t stopped Lawson Wijesooriya. She is the executive director of the Blue Sky Fund, a Richmond-based nonprofit dedicated to providing at-risk youth from low-income homes with opportunities to explore the outdoors through adventure sports and environmental education. A former teacher, Wijesooriya helped create the Blue Sky Fund in an effort to combine her love of the outdoors with her passion for helping the underprivileged kids she was working with on a daily basis. She lives in the same low-income neighborhood of Richmond’s East End as many of the kids in her program, and organizing her first trip consisted of going door-to-door and inviting kids from her street to go backpacking. She has won over many skeptical youngsters stuck in the metro rut who were initially reluctant to take a chance on a new experience in nature. Now, Wijesooriya has a paid staff, and she’s bringing hundreds of kids outside each month—whether it’s through a day trip to a local climbing gym, a science-based educational outing along the James River, or a wilderness trip in the Blue Ridge backcountry. “I was given the opportunity to backpack when I was young, and I know it was a huge part of my coming of age. That’s why I initially believed outdoor experiences would help kids, and why I wanted to give them similar experiences, even if they couldn’t pay for it. I grew up going to private schools that provided plenty of experiential education, and my goal is to provide as many kids as possible with a chance to learn beyond the textbooks and tests of a classroom. Getting kids outdoors involved in something that is hands-on excites them in a way that formal education does not.”“We work with public schools and provide hands-on science education by getting kids familiar with the outdoors in the local area. Every month we take 600 kids from public schools outside to get some hands-on experience, and last year we showed a 19 percent increase in mastery of their standards of learning science concepts. We believe this advanced achievement comes from having a really positive experience in nature.““We are also providing opportunities for kids to use adventure sports to gain life skills. Part of that is still our founding program, which is sending at-risk kids to summer camps, and once a month we run monthly expeditions with the kids that include local outings like day hikes and climbing trips. We also have a unity program, where we take kids on a wilderness trip every summer. It’s specifically focused on bringing together a diverse population, so we recruit high school kids from both public and private schools with affluent and low-income backgrounds and a huge racial mix. When we go out into the woods together, these kids see it as a level playing field. The kids are learning how to get along and meet challenges together, even though many of them come from very different backgrounds. I’ve learned how much of an equalizing common denominator outdoor activities can be.”“Recruitment was one of our first obstacles. In the beginning I was literally dragging some of these kids out of bed. Although now we’re starting to see the fruits of our labors, and many of our expedition trips are regularly filling up, it still isn’t always easy convincing kids that they’ll enjoy the outdoors. Asking a 14-year-old teenager to come into the woods with us and not shower for four days definitely takes some convincing. That’s okay, because it’s the business we want to be in. We understand the value that exposing kids to the outdoors will ultimately have in their lives, and that makes it all worth it. The best thing we have noticed is that once kids have experienced one of our trips, they almost always want to come back.”“When we take kids outside, I can see them connect the dots. I’ve taken kids down to the James River here in Richmond, and they’ve turned around and asked me, ‘Is this the Nile?’ Without real experience, it’s difficult for them to differentiate between what they’re learning in the classroom. It’s amazing to watch kids have that kind of transformative experience and realize what is right in their backyard.”“These experiences make kids believe they can do more than they previously thought they could. I recently watched a girl get outside of her comfort zone on a rock climbing wall. At first she was freaking out, but halfway up the wall, her expression changed, and I could tell she was thinking to herself, ‘I can do this.’”last_img read more

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Trauma Tuesday: Nighttime Red Hook Crit Edition

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first_imgI know, I know. Last week’s Trauma Tuesday also featured road riding road rash, but this video from the Red Hook Crit at the Brooklyn Navy Yard was too good to pass up. This footage was apparently taken during the finals, and you can see most of the riders are going gangbusters around this hot corner. The first wreck may be the worst in terms of numbers as multiple riders fly into the fence/crowd, but the guy who barrels headfirst with no speed check into the railing at 1:06 and the ass-over-tea-kettle face plant at 1:20 seem to result in the most bodily harm, with the second eliciting “MEDIC!” calls from the spectators.What I love about this video – besides the carnage, which is great – is that most of these riders jump back on their bikes after plowing into each other and the pavement. They are still in a race after all. I would probably quit riding a bike, or going outside for that matter, if any of these crashes happened to me. I’d be done with biking, walking, running, or anything else that would result in my taking another spill even remotely as traumatic as these guys, and yet there they are jumping back on their bikes to ride around another circuit, which they know will result in them having to navigate that same turn, only with even more urgency because they will be deeper into the race.Also, they are riding fixed gear single speed bikes. So, yeah..with no brakes, the pile-ups are fast and furious. Although, to be fair, there is a very nice, crowd pleasing save at the 1:45 mark. Speaking of the crowd, kudos for being so lively and supportive/informative to riders and casualties alike.Here’s a bonus vid of one of the wrecks in suuuuuperr slllooooooow moooooooo.last_img read more

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Prominent Asheville Climber Dies in Rappelling Accident

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first_imgKayah Gaydish, a champion of the outdoors and expert rock climber from Asheville, North Carolina, died Sunday after a 50-foot fall from a cliff in the Hidden Valley Lake area of Washington County, Virginia.According to a statement released by the Washington County sheriff’s office, the accident occurred around 4 p.m.“At approximately 4:15 PM, Sunday, December 20, 2015, Washington County Central Dispatch was advised of a rock climbing accident that occurred in the Hidden Valley wildlife management area of the county,” the statement reads. “Initial information received was that a female had fallen approximately 50-feet from a rock cliff during a repelling outing. Friends attempted to resuscitate the victim without success. She was pronounced dead at the scene.”In addition to her love for rock climbing, Gaydish, who was 36-years-old, was a tireless advocate for conservation efforts in Western North Carolina. As a Linville Gorge Wilderness Ranger for a conservation organization called Wild South, she put in many grueling hours locating and removing invasive plants from the famed wilderness area. She also served as a board secretary for the Carolina Cilmber’s Coalition.12391100_10153310577642965_6359501161734564231_nPhoto Courtesy of the Carolina Climbers Coalition“Kayah was someone who could always be counted on for a peaceful smile and gentle encouragement that came from a place of deep passion for the outdoors and her commitment to experience the joy of the wild with everyone she met,” said former Wild South Executive Director Ben Prater in a note posted to the Wild South Facebook page. “If you were fortunate to spend time outside with Kayah then you will know how cherished these memories are. Hold these memories dear and your loved ones close. Kayah will be forever missed and loved always.”Gaydish is survived by her two children, Caleb and River. To donate to Kayah’s memorial fund click here.last_img read more

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How to: Highlands, NC

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first_imgHighlands sits right above the Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina borders. You can only access it by winding ribbon backroads with sneak peaks of the rounded mountain tops you’ll be sleeping next to. Beautiful churches bookend the main street and chime on the hour to remind you of the passing time, even though it seems to slow down here. We visited during a shoulder season when the shoppes have odd hours and the multiple Christmas stores don’t have their sparkle lights shining. With a humble population of under 1,000 in the off-season, it feels like you already know everyone after walking around for just a few days. Once the tourist season gets kicking, over 20,000 people can reside in Highlands, dipping into the kitschy shops and enjoying the ice cream on the corner.Things that make us feel at home in Highlands-Sitting at 4,118 feet, it’s almost as high as Denver, Colorado (5,280 ft).-Two health food grocery stores where Roxy would prefer to sleep instead of the van.Things that make us feel like tourists:-Highlands is considered a rainforest with over 100 inches of rain due to an orographic lifting effect. It’s a literal rain forest! Denver, however, is a high desert.-You can buy a bowtie in every other shop on Main Street.PLAYThis town sits right outside the “Land of Waterfalls,” and we think they may have drawn the borders incorrectly. The roller coaster roads that lead you into the town pass by plenty of waterfalls, and there’s even one right off the road that you can stand under named Bridal Veil Falls. For a bigger waterfall, check out Cullasaja Falls, a short drive out of town.For a more physical adventure, we highly recommend a guided whitewater rafting trip. Our new friend Will at Wildwater Chattooga Adventure Center located just across the border in South Carolina took us out on the rambunctious Chattooga. The family friendly mini trip included mostly class II rapids with a few small class III sections and one killer class IV grand finale. Coincidentally, the class IV rapid (Bull Sluice), was the same area where we cleaned up trash just a few days earlier. We can’t say enough nice things about Will and the entire Wildwater crew. Throughout the day they showed extensive knowledge and appreciation of the river, wildlife, and the surrounding area. One of the things we loved most about Highlands is the abundance of trails, secret overlooks, and winding streams. A little adventuring can get you to some incredible places. Here are a few suggestions of where to start: Lake Jocassee and Jocassee Gorges, Caesar’s Head State Park, and DuPont State Forest. Highlands is a great jumping off spot for all of these!EATJust like any good tourist town, eating options are aplenty. Unfortunately for us, most restaurants had winter hours in effect and they didn’t quite mesh with our hectic schedule. We managed to grab a killer homestyle breakfast at a small cafe called Bake My Day. The no-frills menu featured all your normal breakfast staples and the food was delicious. It’s not easy to make a plate of eggs, hash browns, and sausage stand out from the crowd, but Bake My Day has it all figured out. No matter what time of day, we recommend visiting Mountain Fresh Grocery and Wine Market. This all-in-one grocery store/pizza place/coffee shop/wine market had everything we were looking for. As we sat in the cafe to catch up on some morning writing it was obvious that this is a top spot for locals to get their morning fuel. They offer full-service breakfast, lunch, and dinner.If you plan on entertaining or would just rather cook at home, Rhodes Superette is the place for you. Locals say this place sells the best hand-cut steaks in North Carolina. You can get anything in this small roadside grocery. They have a bakery in-house that you can smell from a block away. On the day we visited a woman stopped in and asked the baker if they had scones, the baker smiled and said she’d bake some for the woman and have them ready that afternoon. That’s service you just won’t find at a normal grocery store.STAYHighlands has a slew of quaint hotels located right on Main Street. Even in the off-season, they were a little more expensive than we typically like to spend on lodging. If you’re feeling extra fancy and willing to fork over the cash, there are some vacation rentals available with breathtaking views of the surrounding mountains. For those looking for something a little less glamorous, there are three great campgrounds just a few miles outside of town. The Van Hook Glade Campground is the most developed option. Located about 15 minutes from town in the heart of Nantahala National Forest, the campground has 18 sites each for $20 a night. You’ll be in close proximity to hiking trails, scenic views, waterfalls, and a nearby lake. You can reserve your site in advance here.Blue Valley Campground (we spent a few nights here) is a wonderful area with several free primitive campsites. We saw at least ten sites but locals in the area told us there were much more down the road. Each site comes complete with a fire ring, lantern post, and a picnic table. You won’t find cell service here, so you can relax and enjoy quality time with friends and family. There is no trash service so please respect the land and observe leave no trace practices.Ammons Branch Campground has five primitive campsites and a single pit toilet. The spots are fairly small, close together, and might not be ideal if you have a large vehicle. There are hiking trails leading right out of the campground that connects to the nearby Ellicott Rock Wilderness Trail.Highlands was founded by drawing a line from Chicago to Savannah, and from New York City to New Orleans, figuring where those lines met would one day turn into a popular trading center. While it didn’t become the commercial crossroads that was expected, the golfing community did claim it as its own and from there it grew into a unique town._____________________________________________________________________Like what we’re rockin’? Check out La Sportiva for threads, and LifeStraw for the most handy waterbottle.last_img read more

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Who Will Be Crowned The Top Adventure College Of 2018?

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first_imgTop Adventure College ContestBRO’s Bracket BrawlWhat’s the best outdoor school in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic? Beginning March 19, Blue Ridge Outdoors’ Top Adventure College Tournament, sponsored by ENO Hammocks, asks readers to pick the winners. Colleges and universities meet in head-to-head matchups in a 32-school bracket. In each contest, the school receiving the most votes advances to the next round.Larger schools (more than 5,000 students) go head-to-head on one side of the bracket, while smaller schools square off on the other side. The two division winners face off in a David-meets-Goliath championship to determine the regions’ best outdoor school.The initial 32 colleges and universities were selected for their outdoor clubs and curricula, their commitment to outdoor and environmental initiatives, the quality of their outdoor athletes and programs, and their opportunities for adventure.Will your alma mater take the tournament crown? Rally students, alumni, and supporters around your college or university. Voting begins March 19 at contests.blueridgeoutdoors.com. Voting ends at 9 a.m. Monday of each week.Round of 32: March 19 –April 2Sweet 16: April 2 – 9Elite 8: April 9 – 16Final Four: April 16 – 23Championship: April 23 – 30Visit blueridgeoutdoors.com to vote and to view the complete 32-school bracket.Want to help support your school? Shoot and share a one-minute (or less) video showing everyone why your college is the best adventure college in the region and Blue Ridge Outdoors will feature selected videos on our site and social media platforms. At the end of the contest, the team at ENO will select their favorite submission and the winner will receive an ENO hammock package! Post your video to Instagram, tag @blueridgeoutdoors and @enohammocks, use the hashtag #topadventurecollege in the caption and you’re entered to win.For more information, contact digital publisher Dusty Allison ([email protected] or 828-225-0868) or Justin Forrest at ([email protected] or 828-225-0868).last_img read more

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The Legendary ‘Batigol’ Now Makes Polo Goals Tremble‎

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first_imgBy Dialogo March 04, 2009 Gabriel Batistuta, adored at the Italian Fiorentina and the greatest striker in the history of Argentina’s ‎national soccer team, is now shaking the bars of polo goals while making fun of himself for often missing ‎with the mallet, missing many goals, and falling off his horse.‎ This week, the legendary ‘Batigol’ became Argentinean polo’s newest attraction after scoring the winning ‎goal for his team, Loro Piana, over Chapelco (12-11) during his debut at the ‘Campo Argentino del Polo,’ ‎the ‘cathedral’ of this elite sport.‎ ‎“My field of expertise is soccer, and despite having played today with a lot of adrenaline, I am still taking ‎my first steps in polo and embarrassing myself,” said the striker while in the central district of Palermo, ‎where he was acclaimed.‎ Surrounded by women, children, and a crowd of journalists on the field, the man who several times ‎mesmerized the fans of Newell’s Old Boys, Boca Juniors, Fiorentina, Roma, and Inter de Italia, showed ‎that his charisma, humor, and spirit remain the same.‎ At age 40, four years after leaving the soccer field, Batistuta traded his “rip-net” cleats for brown boots to ‎debut in the mythical metropolitan scenario during the third phase of the “IV Argentina Polo Tour Patio ‎Bullrich 2009.”‎ ‎“I think it is great that Batistuta has found his world in the sport of polo. His is a gentleman in and out of ‎the field,” said Marcela Lopez Delgado, a 39-year-old forensic doctor and polo lover.‎ People of all ages and social classes saw him riding and handling the mallet, showing that polo has ‎managed to leave the tight aristocratic circle thanks to Adolfito Cambiaso, the best player in the world and ‎Batistuta’s friend.‎ Playing as a forward and as his friend’s teammate, he scored the last point with a “bati-winner” attitude, ‎eclipsing with his charisma the “Maradona of Polo,” who scored eleven of the twelve goals for his team.‎ ‎“Batistuta surprised me in a good way, and all he needs is to improve his ‘swing,’” said polo player ‎Eduardo ‘Russo’ Heguy (former handicapped 10), honoring this famous polo family’s surname.‎ The crowd gave it up to the historical striker of the Argentina national team (56 goals), when he debuted in ‎Palermo wearing white jeans, a helmet, a mallet, a visor, and a navy blue shirt with a “1” on the back.‎ The team of this player, who was born in Santa Fe (central-east), where the fields are located, is called Loro ‎Piana, where its owner, the Italian businessman Alfio Marchini, also plays.‎ Despite his zero handicap, ‘Bati-polista’ broke social and sports barriers with his presence at a stand selling ‎bacon or Argentina steak sandwiches at a price equivalent to four dollars, beer for three dollars, and sodas ‎for two dollars in a rainy afternoon in Buenos Aires.‎ Diego and Marina White, a married couple who are fans of this exquisite sport and manufacturers of polo ‎uniforms, also admired Batistuta during the six chukkers of the game.‎ ‎“Most importantly, he rides the horse very well and his presence boosts the sport’s popularity,” said the ‎Whites.‎ At the fourth chukker, Batistuta almost scored, but his mallet fell and spun up in the air, and at the end of ‎the period he fell on the ground, due to inexperience.‎ In the fifth chukker he demonstrated why he is known as ‘Batigol,’ when, with one strike he earned soccer ‎cheers from the polo fans when the ball crossed in front of the net, bringing the match to a tie with nine ‎goals.‎last_img read more

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