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Archives for: January 26, 2021

SMC to hold social work week

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first_imgTo inform, to learn and to volunteer — those are the goals of Saint Mary’s Social Work Week. This week, the Social Work Department will highlight its diverse field of study with various events held each day, including a speech today by Laura Recio, a registered play therapist supervisor of Counseling Solution in Spes Unica at 9:30 a.m. The importance of social work week has its grounding in teaching students about what they can achieve with a social work degree. “Students learn that they can work in diverse settings, including hospitals, medical centers, schools, congressional offices, mental health centers, colleges and businesses,” Dr. Frances Kominkiewicz, director of the Social Work program, said. However, the week benefits all students, not just Social Work majors. “Social work is essential in the way we live our lives today. Typically people link social workers to Child Protective Services and Welfare offices, but social workers are everywhere, and their positions can be found under almost every career heading,” Alma Bravo, a junior Social Work major, said, Wednesday, students can learn how to de-stress with a lesson in origami art in the Saint Mary’s Student Center atrium from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, Becky Ruvalcaba, the executive director of South Bend’s LaCasa de Amistad will speak from noon to 1 p.m. in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall. According to Kominkiewicz, LaCasa de Amistad is a non-profit organization that provides services to the Hispanic community. Friday wraps up the week with a breakfast outside of the Social Work suite on the second floor of Spes Unica from 9:30 to 11 a.m., and a speech on Gerontology by Andrea Verteramo in conference rooms A and B of the Noble Family Dining Hall at noon, Kominkiewicz said. According to Leonard Sanchez, professor of Specialist and Social Work, the events have something for everyone. “There’s a social worker in everybody,” Sanchez said. “Human relations, integrity, competence — it’s what our department is about, but it goes beyond that. We show how to give to each other and the community.” Sanchez said the week is being held to encourage people to take action within the little time they have at Saint Mary’s. “Four years may seem like a long time to the students, but it flies,” Sanchez said. “We teach that everyone can make a difference in the world, even if only a small difference. We aren’t trying to change the world all at once — just our little piece of South Bend.” Sanchez said he hopes to show students they can make a difference, and that their “presence counts.” “People want to do something, they just don’t know how. Social work week bridges that impossible gap,” Sanchez said. Kominkiewicz said the importance of the event is for all students, but for the first years especially. “First-year students find that they learn a great deal about Social Work as a major and as a profession. Feedback indicates that social work week was most helpful to them in deciding to become a social work major,” Kominkiewicz said. All students are encouraged to attend the week’s events in an effort “to make Saint Mary’s stronger in the community,” Sanchez said. “It’s the little things you do for others that moves mountains.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s College hosts Peace Project Contest

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first_imgSaint Mary’s College hosted the Peace Project Contest as the final installment in a series of events held this week in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students submitted poems, artwork and speeches dedicated to the messages left by the Civil Rights leader. Tamara Taylor, assistant director of Student Involvement and Multicultural Services, said the project was a way for students to use their creativity to celebrate the life of Dr. King and his dream for peace. “Traditionally, ‘Celebrate Martin Luther King’ has only been one day and it has traditionally been the day we get back,” she said. “It has gotten lost in the shuffle, so we decided, ‘Why not do a week?’” Jacquitta Martin, president of the Sisters of Nefertiti, said the sisters helped plan and execute the event. “This contest started out as an oratorical contest. Then sisters asked why limit to just speech when we can open it up to allow students to be more creative,” she said. The 10 entries in the contest ranged from original poetry to a short film. Junior Elizabeth Elsbach won the top prize, a spa package from J. Ross Salon and Spa, for her poem. “I decided to write a poem because when you are expressing something as intangible as peace, you have to use something intangible like poetry to reach out and stir up the desire to reach a common goal,” she said. First year Asha Gilmore took second prize with her original film. The film originally began as a project for a social work class, she said. “It was a project where we compared and contrasted three different writers: Sister Madaleva, Mary Jane Adams and Martin Luther King, Jr.,” she said. “I decided I wanted to use song and intensity in the animations to make the project more memorable.” Junior Lizzy Schroff finished in third place for her poem. “I write a lot of poetry, and I like poetry because I like to express things through a new perspective and grab people’s attention with vivid imagery, and [allow them] to see things in a new light,” she said. Vice President of Student Affairs Karen Johnson served on a panel of judges and helped choose the winner of the contest. “I was amazed by how excellent everything was, and it should be shared with the community,” she said. Elaine Meyer-Lee, the director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership, also served as a judge. “I think it is really great that so many students came out and created something with so much substance,” she said. “It was a meaningful event that is worthy of the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.”last_img read more

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CLC discusses GSA proposal, Morris visits

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first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed various viewpoints and implications surrounding the proposed Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) during their meeting Monday afternoon. Student body chief of staff and senior Claire Sokas said Student Senate decided to reassess how students feel about forming a GSA. In response, CLC met with a representative from the 4 to 5 Movement, a student initiative in support of creating a GSA, to gain further insight on student opinion. Alex Coccia, sophomore and co-president of the Progressive Student Alliance (PSA), spoke for the movement. “I would like to clarify that PSA is not a substitute for GSA,” he said. “We are inherently an activist group and LGBT is only one of the things we work on. With that said, the 4 to 5 Movement is our initiative to get allies involved and voicing their opinion.” Coccia said the movement is based on the statistic that four out of five people are part of a supportive majority that remains silent. The movement works to encourage allies to voice their opinion and remain in contact with the unrecognized student LGBTQ group on campus, he said. “The unofficial group is AllianceND. Because it’s not recognized, it’s not allowed to publicize or promote itself on campus,” he said. “It meets regularly, but you have to be in tune and know who to talk to in order to know when meetings are.” He said members of the PSA meet often with AllianceND and remain informed on student opinion. He said students advocate the creation of a GSA for several reasons. “First, people who want to take leadership roles without publicizing their sexuality, like being on the Core Council brochure, would benefit from a GSA. Second, because it’s membership oriented, it has growth potential,” Coccia said. “Having more students involved is extremely important in promoting the campus atmosphere we want.” Coccia said beyond these points, a student-run organization would encourage the involvement of straight allies. A club devoted to the elimination of homophobia on campus with help from classmates and dormmates is essential, he said. Sr. Sue Dunn, assistant vice president of Student Affairs, said the Core Council holds meetings in the Gold Room each month as an opportunity for people to come together. “We have an educational topic to discuss and it’s confidential,” she said. Coccia said while meetings in the Gold Room are helpful and welcome allies, they do not meet all of the needs of the community. A GSA would increase participation on a weekly basis, he said. “My impression and what I’ve been told by people interested in GSA — the truly committed attend the Gold Room each month,” he said. “Whereas in a GSA with weekly meetings, you can come and go as you like.” Coccia said the involvement of LGBTQ community members and allies is essential to ending homophobia on campus. The lack of a GSA makes this difficult, he said. “In the Notre Dame family, this means including everyone,” he said. Dunn said the strength behind this student push came from the increased organization among the LGBTQ community in the past three semesters. “It was not clear before what direction to go in or what involvement they wanted to have with other groups,” she said. “There’s more of a presence and student energy is being put into what they want to do now.” Student body president Pat McCormick said the discussion would continue in Senate on Wednesday in hope of deciding on a resolution. “I think it’s a sign of hope in being creative for developing support for a community that has expressed a need. Thank you to Sr. Sue and Core Council for a transformative set of years,” he said. “Now, we need to figure out how we could get something off the ground either in Core Council or on its own.” After closing the discussion on a GSA, McCormick added that the Morris Performing Arts Center in South Bend is interested in increasing student attendance at its shows. McCormick said he addressed the concern about transportation when meeting with representatives from the Center in downtown South Bend. “The city, Morris Center and student government hope to work together on this project to get some exciting performances and spur economic growth in the city,” he said.last_img read more

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SMC sponsors summer camp for local students

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first_img‘The Status of Girls of Indiana,’ a report published by Saint Mary’s College in Sept. 2013 found that female students in the state of Indiana fall behind boys in SAT, ACT and AP testing in math and science classes. In order to combat this trend, Saint Mary’s chemistry students sponsored an educational summer camp for Elkhart elementary school students, senior Dara Marquez said.Each grade ran a different science experiment to make their own polymer, or slime, Marquez said.“We had them mix polyvinyl alcohol and borax, a common experiment to do at home, and they added their own food coloring to it,” Marquez said. “At the end they had a gooey product. It was really neat to instruct them on what to do and to observe them as they did it. It reminded me how different perspectives, especially for kids, can affect the way we view science.”Marquez said it was empowering to know that the students were curious and wanted to learn more about the polymers. She said she strongly believes showing younger children the physical aspect of science allows them to relate it to their current interests.“Experiences like those push us more to understand why it is important to always be willing to be mentors,” Marquez said.Marquez said she believes younger children are much more curious than adults, which helped made their experiments engaging to the elementary school students.“Their curiosity and the fact that at their age science isn’t intimidating makes me believe that if we maintain that attitude as they get older and learn more difficult concepts they’d be much more interested in pursuing it as a career,” Marquez said.Marquez said there was equal participation among boys and girls, but their attitudes were generally different.“I’ve noticed that girls are much more meticulous and careful overall when running an experiment,” Marquez said. “They usually want to do it the right way the first time and want to make sure that they ask the right questions. Usually that’s why you assume they’re the quietest, but in reality they’re just trying to best articulate their curiosity.”Saint Mary’s Affiliate of the American Chemical Society’s (SMAACS) goal is to increase participation of our students and the community in extra curricular chemistry events, SMAACS senior president Katherine Bussey said.“It is my hope and passion to ignite an interest in each child we work with, so that they will pursue further education in math and science fields,” Bussey said.In regards to the ‘Status of Girls’ report, Bussey said she believes the math and science test gap between boys and girls is an issue that needs to be addressed.“I believe that by encouraging girls to participate in math and science activities early on, we can boost their confidence so that later on in their education they do not think twice about choosing a field that is ‘traditionally male,’” Bussey said. “Women are just as capable of engineering the next International Space Station, developing the next Mandelbrot set, understanding Black-body radiation, or curing cancer.”Saint Mary’s also held a forensic camp on campus this summer with the similar goal of exposing young students to different aspects of science.The Forensic Science Camp, part of the Saint Mary’s College summer academic program, introduces young women in grades 8-12 to the college experience, assistant director of special events Lisa Peppers said. The camp used fun activities to instill a scientific mindset in the young students.“After gathering evidence at a staged crime scene, Forensic Science campers, working in Saint Mary’s College labs, use biology, chemistry, mathematics, and deductive reasoning to solve the crime and find the culprit,” Peppers said.Peppers said the goal is to encourage the mathematical and scientific interests in young women.“In addition, we hope our summer camp helps female students improve their test scores in both math and science.”Tags: camp, saint mary’s, science, status of girlslast_img read more

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Vidal delivers State of the Student Union to senate

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first_imgTags: ND student senate, State of the Student Union Student body president Lauren Vidal delivered her State of the Student Union address last night at the final student Senate meeting of the 2014-2015 term.In the speech, Vidal quoted a 1985 note from Fr. Ted Hesburgh, describing the 10 commandments of student leaders.“I would like to introduce a note from Fr. Hesburgh to the then-student body president and vice president,” the senior said.“‘Politics is the art of the possible, so pick out some realistic goals and really go for them,’” she said, quoting Hesburgh.Vidal also thanked the senators, as well as the cabinet that served under her and student body vice president Matthew Devine before highlighting some of this year’s successes, including the launch of the O’SNAP app and forming contracts with The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal as part of the student readership program. She also mentioned some of the most pressing issues the University still has to contend with, particularly the mental health of its students.Vidal, Devine and Shannon Montague, Student Union chief of staff, gave the spring Board of Trustees presentation, which focused on addressing issues with the mental health of Notre Dame students. Vidal said they had reviewed an assortment of research of Notre Dame’s peer universities, such as Duke, to better understand the problem at Notre Dame.“Many of [Duke’s] professors have published articles on the culture of their campus,” Vidal said. “There is an entire article, as well as a survey, about perfectionism at Duke, acknowledging that perfectionism exists and affects the majority of students who make it to these elite universities. Perfectionism is linked to instances of depression and severe anxiety.”Two resolutions were presented. The first, presented by Vidal and Montague on behalf of Devine, proposed the submission of an open letter from Notre Dame’s student body to the University’s peer institutions regarding the deaths of three Muslim students at the University of North Carolina. Devine, who could not present the resolution because he currently serves as the chair of senate, wrote the letter in conjunction with Diversity Council and the Muslim Student Association (MSA).Several senators brought up their concerns with the letter, noting that it came off as “too introspective” and did not portray Notre Dame in a positive light, resulting in a discussion of different aspects of the appropriateness of the letter. Vidal said she felt the letter needed more collaboration, and said she agreed that the wording needed to be reconsidered. She officially tabled the resolution until the senate meeting next week, when Devine will be out of office and able to speak on his own behalf with the senators.The second resolution, presented by Morrissey Hall senator Brian Cimons, was intended to clarify an ambiguity regarding student endorsements of candidates or tickets, specifically to prevent succession planning.Kathryn Peruski, president of Judicial Council, said the ambiguity needed to be addressed but that this specific resolution was not adequate, partially because student groups, such as the Student Union and the Student Activities Office, did not have rules outlined clearly enough. Peruski also said that the resolution in general needed to be more clear.“Judicial Council agrees this is a section that needs to be tackled,” Peruski said. “It is ambiguous and causing problems. It needs to be tackled slowly and carefully so the language is the best and that we are protecting the constitution and what is written here, and it doesn’t need to be tackled today.”The resolution was not passed, and the issue will be addressed next term.The newly-elected student senators will be sworn in for their first meeting next Wednesday.last_img read more

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Farley to host annual signature event Be Fine Day

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first_imgPhoto courtesy of Clare Cahir Senior Lauren Saunee poses with the Farley Be Fine Day sign at last year’s Farley Hall signature event. The event benefits the YWCA Women’s Shelter in North Central Indiana.Sophomore Catherine Sullivan, the Farley Be Fine Day’s co-coordinator along with sophomore Clare Cahir, said that they hope the event will help bring awareness to the YWCA’s work in the community.“It would be a great thing if we could spread the word about what this type of organization does for the women in the community of South Bend,” Sullivan said. “They’re a wonderful organization that takes in battered women, women with drug issues and their whole model is to just help everyone and be there for people.”The mission of the YWCA — to increase the opportunities, health and safety of all women — resonated with Farley Hall’s residents, Cahir said.“We love to push the empowerment of women, so we partnered with the women’s shelter in South Bend, the YWCA,” she said. “ … Being an all-girls dorm, [the YWCA’s mission] really connects with how we like to push the image of a strong woman.”The Coffee House will also include performances by student musicians.Friday morning will see residents of Farley Hall out around campus distributing buttons and bananas to promote Farley Be Fine Day and the YWCA women’s shelter.Farley Be Fine Day’s main event, “A Walk in Her Shoes,” features a walk around North Quad in high-heels. A Walk in Her Shoes will take place at 4 p.m. Friday, and one can register online through the Farley Be Fine Day’s Facebook page or in person at the event.Cahir said that the high-heel walk provides a playful yet serious opportunity to examine expectations of women in society.“[The high-heel walk] is supposed to be light-hearted, a little funny, but … it’s supposed to be a representation of hardships women go through,” she said. “ … The high heels themselves are supposed to be representative of a wide array of issues that women face.”A Walk in Her Shoes will give many men a chance to walk in high-heels for the first time, an experience which, although it may seem silly, is a glimpse into modern femininity, Cahir said.“Guys are welcome — we have high heel shoes of all sizes. I know it’s a surface level thing, but it kind of gives you an insight into the depths of being a woman,” she said. “It’s a representation of being a woman and shows how some of our hardships are based on something superficial.”Cahir said she was optimistic about how Farley Be Fine Day’s events could promote a discussion of the issues faced by women in light of Notre Dame’s single-gender dorm system.“Almost especially because of how the dorm system at Notre Dame is, that gives us the perfect opportunity to push women empowerment — since we’re separated into all-girls dorm,” she said. “I definitely think that types of issues that women face our generation — or at least in the campus community we’re in right now — you don’t see [them discussed] super often.”Sullivan said that she hopes that Farley Be Fine Day will encourage a culture of female empowerment and camaraderie on campus.“Being in a college setting, it’s always on your mind — look out for your girls,” she said. “Especially at Notre Dame, the way the dorms are set up and the way the culture is here, it’s very important for girls to feel they have [people looking out for them].”Tags: Farley Be Fine Day, Farley Hall, female empowerment, Feminism, signature event The fourth-annual Farley Hall Be Fine Day, Farley Hall’s signature event promoting dialogue on femininity and raising money and awareness for the YWCA Women’s Shelter in North Central Indiana, will take place Friday.The festivities are scheduled to kick off Thursday at 9 p.m. in Farley Hall’s Middle Room with a “Coffee House” event. The Coffee House will center around a talk given by a representative from the YWCA on the organization’s work and mission.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s London summer program provides students with unique opportunities

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first_imgThe LEB Summer Program at Saint Mary’s offers students an opportunity to take classes and participate in practicums in London for four weeks over the summer. Students must have at least a 2.5 GPA, but any major can participate. The program was founded by the College’s Interim Provost, Jill Vihtelic, in 2015. Since then, Saint Mary’s has sent several students to London. Junior business administration major Mia Washington traveled to London in the summer of 2018. “I took a course on globalization and worked for a company which did work on wireless chargers,” Washington said. “I did market research and analysis. At the end, we were able to present our findings to the CEO, which was really cool.” Washington lived in apartment-style housing and was responsible for her own meals, which she said taught her independence and helped her gain confidence. “It was up to us to purchase our own food and learn to cook,” Washington said. “It helped teach me how to navigate a new country by myself and learn about the diverse culture, society and even the political climate in London.” Washington said her decision to go to London was due to family experiences. “My dad had always wanted to take our family to London,” she said. “He’s an artist, and he always wanted to study the stained glass of London. I decided to go and to take advantage of the opportunity given.” Jennifer Zachman, faculty coordinator of study abroad programs, said there are several classes students can take in London along with the practicum. “All the classes have to do with London in some way or another,” she said. “There’s British Life and Culture, Globalization, Discovering London’s Architecture and Design, Digital Photography and Nutritional and Exercise Management.” Although no students will be sent from Saint Mary’s this year, Zachman said, the program will do more promoting next year and try to have an earlier deadline. “It’s a pretty small program, but students know immediately after if they’re accepted,” she said. “They have to apply through us with an essay and then through LEB, but if we accept them, it’s almost guaranteed that LEB will as well.” Zachman said classes can count either as credit for the Sophia Program in Liberal Learning or as an elective.“It’s a very unique and incredible opportunity,” she said. “Students can get practical experience in business while living in an amazing and multicultural city.”Washington expanded on some additional opportunities for students that she took advantage of while abroad. “The London School of Economics is right next to where students stay,” she said. “We were able to attend presentations by professors. One I really enjoyed was a professor who gave us the full rundown on Brexit — what it was, how people really felt about it and how the government was dealing with issues.” Mana Derakhshani, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), said the London study abroad program is a unique experience for students.“London is such a cosmopolitan center of business culture, a combination of old history and new development due to migration and new technology,” Derakhshani said. “It’s a unique experience, especially because most of our study abroad programs are not in large, multicultural cities like London.” Derakshani had one major piece of advice for students looking into the London program. “Be flexible, be open, be ready to adapt and experience new things,” she said. “If you expect everything [to be] the way you think it will, don’t do this program.”Tags: London, London LEB summer program, saint mary’s, study abroadlast_img read more

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‘I was supposed to be protected’: Yusef Salaam speaks at Notre Dame as part of Race Relations Week

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first_imgKelli Smith | The Observer Yusef Salaam, one of the “Central Park Five” wrongly accused of raping a jogger in 1989, spoke on Friday about his experience as a teen in juvenile prison and the comfort and growth he found in his faith.It was a question that eventually helped lead Salaam to an entirely new perspective: He was meant to be in prison.Salaam is one of five men who was wrongfully convicted of raping and brutally assaulting a female jogger in 1989 in New York City’s Central Park. He was imprisoned at 16 years old and served nearly seven years before the real perpetrator confessed to the crime. Known collectively as the “Central Park Five,” Salaam and the other four men — four of whom are black and one who is latino — were exonerated in 2002.Now an inspirational speaker, Salaam shared his experiences with about 400 people at Washington Hall on Friday night as part of Notre Dame Student Government’s “Race Relations Week.”“When we were first accused of this crime, there were over 400 articles written about us,” Salaam said. “There was a tsunami of media that was destined to the murder of us. And we somehow survived. We weren’t supposed to survive … but somehow, miraculously, we came out of prison.”Salaam said he was convicted for the worst crime in New York City at the time. Throughout the trial he went through as a teenager, he couldn’t reconcile the hatred everyone had in their eyes.“Then when [the court] asked me if I had anything to say before they sentenced me … they were telling me that I should not live on purpose,” he said. “They were telling me to turn my life down. But when I stood up, God put something in me.”Reading what he told the court at the time, Salaam recited his poem “I stand accused.” The poem was met with thunderous applause from Friday’s crowd of attendees, but Salaam said the court in 1990 didn’t react so positively.“I was 16 years old and what I was trying to get at was the understanding that I had been given in this short amount of time, that here I was in America,” Salaam said. “Here I was supposed to be protected. Here I was supposed to be afforded the same opportunity as the law. But America was looking at me as if I was not even a whole person — as if I was 3/5 of a human being.”He wanted that sentiment to be addressed, he said, because being in America doesn’t make him an American.Salaam held up a full-page ad U.S. President Donald Trump took out in the New York Times after the Central Park incident, which called for the death penalty and police to be “brought back.” Trump was whispering into the darkest places of society, Salaam said. He referenced recent high-profile cases in which black men were shot and killed by police officers.“It’s such a horrible thing when you realize that you are not protected under the law,” Salaam said. “That oftentimes, if your name is Tamir Rice, or Treyvon Martin, or Eric Garner — as a matter of fact Eric Garner is interesting. Because he kept telling the officers, ‘I can’t breathe.’”The interesting thing about Garner’s case, Salaam noted, is that on the side of any cop car are the noble words “serve and protect.”“As a matter of fact, in New York City it goes a step further,” he said. “It says courtesy, professionalism and respect. Now I feel like everyone wants to be treated courteously, definitely with professionalism and most certainly respect … but when Eric Garner kept saying ‘I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe,’ they didn’t give him the first letters [on] that cop car. … I began to understand this in a completely different way.”During his own time in prison, rather than crying “Why me?” to God, Salaam said he also eventually saw his experience in a different light.“Now I understood that when they call prison the belly of the beast, that is similar to a mother’s womb,” Salaam said. “Where in the belly of your mother, you’re being shaped and formed in order to find a purpose and to survive. … The fact that we made it means we were born on purpose, and not only were we formed on purpose but we were formed with a purpose.”In such a way, Salaam likens prison to a cocoon because life inside “becomes stillborn” but growth is still possible.“One of the most fascinating things about life is that you can never truly understand what you’re going through or rather what you’re growing through until you look back on your path,” Salaam said. “… And so the story of the Central Park Five, now known as the Exonerated Five, turns into a love story.”God put them in a space that allowed them to become working class citizens, Salaam said, and also allowed for the criminal justice system to begin to be restored from being “a criminal system of injustice.”“I want people to know that when you find yourself in so-called dark places, there’s always a light somewhere in the darkness,” he said. “And even if that light is inside you, you can illuminate your light in the darkness.”The “Central Park Five” case gained even more attention recently following Netflix’s summer release of the series “When They See Us” — a drama based on the case that is nominated for 16 Emmys. Salaam fielded a question during a question and answer portion of the lecture about the series.“Our prison time was hard but it wasn’t what I expected when I saw ‘When They See Us,’ Salaam said. “As a matter of fact, when we got to part four [filmmaker] Ava Duvernay pulled me aside and she said ‘Yusef, this is the TV version. We can’t show all of it. We can’t show how bad it was.’”We have to see ourselves as our future selves, Salaam said. In that way, he often circles back to that question the officer asked him six months into his prison time — who are you?Spurred on by that officer’s question, he discovered the true meaning behind the name his parents gave him.“My parents named me a sentence: God will increase the teacher with justice and peace,” Salaam said.That realization helped alter his perspective, he said, and allowed him to see that growth allows people to plant seeds for the future and look at themselves in the past, present and future tense.“It’s so beautiful when you know that everything that happens to you was supposed to happen,” he said.Tags: Central Park Five, criminal justice, police brutality, Race Relations Week, Yusef Salaam Six months into Yusef Salaam’s prison sentence, an officer came up to him with one question: Who are you?It was a seemingly innocuous question, but it was one Salaam says changed the “total trajectory” of his life.“I said ‘I’m Yusef Salaam, one of the guys accused of raping the Central Park jogger but I didn’t do it,’” Salaam said. “[The officer] said, ‘No but I’ve been watching you. You’re not supposed to be here. Why are you here? Who are you?’ … That question allowed me to look at myself and understand something that I never truly understood.”last_img read more

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Rangers Rescue Man From Cattaraugus Creek

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.CATTARAUGUS CREEK – Forest rangers from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation say they rescued a male hiker who fell off a ledge into the Cattaraugus Creek, injuring both legs, after he was separated from his hiking group at around 8:30 p.m. May 27. Forest rangers Wayne Krulish and Justin Thaine responded to the area of Cattaraugus Creek after another hiker in the area found the injured man and called 911.The rangers reportedly followed 911 coordinates placing the man on the South Branch of the creek.At 11:25 p.m., rescuers from the Gowanda Volunteer Fire Department reached the 29-year-old man from Allegany, secured him in a litter, and carried him out to the Forty Road parking area, arriving at 1 a.m. Ranger Thaine conducted interviews and the injured hiker was transported to a local hospital for medical treatment. All Rangers left the area by 3 a.m.last_img read more

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34 New COVID Cases Reported Monday, State Opening Additional Testing Sites

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Jordan E. Gilbert / USMC JAMESTOWN – Additional sites to test people for COVID-19 will be opening in Chautauqua and Cattaraugus Counties part of an incentive by the New York State Health Department.State leaders announced on Monday afternoon that three sites between the two counties will be open to the public for free rapid result tests this week.Chautauqua County’s sites are located at the Jamestown Fireman’s Training Grounds on Harrison Street and the Dunkirk Fireman’s Training Grounds on Brigham Road. Those who would like to make an appointment are asked to register online.In Cattaraugus County testing will take place through Saturday at the Allegany Fire Hall on West Main Street in Allegany from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Those looking to make an appointment are asked to call (716) 938-9119. Earlier in the morning Chautauqua County officials reported 34 new cases of the virus from Saturday to Monday. Officials say 133 active cases continue to recover under orders of isolation.Eighteen people remain hospitalized in Chautauqua County due to COVID as of Saturday.The new cases involve the following locations:14 cases in 14701 (Jamestown)2 cases in 14136 (Silver Creek)2 cases in 14710 (Ashville)1 case in 14738 (Frewsburg)9 cases in 14048 (Dunkirk)1 case in 14062 (Forestville)1 case in 14782 (Sinclairville)1 case in 14063 (Fredonia)1 case in 14750 (Lakewood)2 cases in 14733 (Falconer)There are currently 15 active cases among employees and 62 active cases among residents associated with Tanglewood Manor. Two people associated with that outbreak have recovered.last_img read more

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