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Archives for: April 21, 2021

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first_imgI am absolutely thrilled for Martin Lightbody! The celebration cake maker who also makes bakery snacks has agreed to sell the company to Finsbury Foods for £37.5m (see pg 4). Martin led the sale of Lightbody’s 26 retail shops in 1995 to set up a wholesale company. In that time he and his team have driven turnover from zero to £50m.While one may lament that the proposed acquisition by Finsbury means the end of a 100-year-old independent family company, you also have to look at the benefits it will bring. Martin tells me he is looking forward to driving innovation in other parts of Finsbury Food, where he will shortly be the major shareholder with almost 30% of the overall shares. He is relishing the thought of his new role as strategic development director and entering the Baking Industry Awards, where his past trophies are testament to Lightbody’s success.The proposed deal also means more opportunities in cross-selling because while Lightbody has Marks & Spencer and Carrefour as customers, Finsbury has the Co-op, Tesco and Waitrose, for example. Group turnover will now shoot up to £140m a year and group staffing to 2,500.Finsbury Food, which owns several premium cake companies and two bakeries, is run by chief executive Dave Brooks, who, like Martin Lightbody has boundless enthusiasm, tempered by commercial and common sense. The chartered management accountant was appointed chief executive of Finsbury in November 2002 and has led growth of the group by acquisition. Lightbody is the best buy yet.Also this week, a new supermarket is coming to town in the shape of Whole Foods Market (pgs 6,24). I have always been struck by the fact that there have been no words to bridge the gap between organic and standard foods. All that may be about to change. The debut of Whole Foods in this country in June, with its emphasis on the word ’natural’ (no artificial additives, colours, flavours or preservatives) may mean we see a lot more ’natural’ breads and cakes.But across the whole bakery sector, the problem would be one of policing. Organic, which we focus on this week and next, means you have to have accreditation from a specific body. ’Natural’ would be nigh impossible to monitor.last_img read more

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Julian Hunt, communications director, Food and Drink Federation (FDF)

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first_imgAnd lo, from the land of the batty folk came a new report calling for a fat tax on food products. Even though the report was riddled with inconsistencies, the boffins who authored this nonsense still managed to claim that as many as 3,000 lives would be saved by a tax on ’unhealthy’ products such as cakes, pastries and biscuits.Never mind that, in the process, and by the authors’ own slightly bizarre calculations, food prices would be pushed up, consumption of fruit and veg would decline and – oh yes – the report’s estimates on how many lives would be saved should be treated as ’crude’.This nonsense came out earlier this month in a paper published in the rather grand-sounding Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health and, sadly, created a mini media storm as to whether a fat tax would result in a healthier nation.It all blew over very quickly, thank goodness, but only after we had spent a couple of days forcibly reminding people that such a move would actually be a tax on the poor, who tend to spend more of their disposable income on food. Moreover, there’s certainly no compelling evidence to suggest such a regressive taxation policy would make us any thinner.The work the industry is doing to reformulate its products with alternatives that are lower in fat or salt will have a far bigger impact on the nation’s health than any new food tax. But the authors of this report clearly don’t live in the real world. So now they are safely back in their ivory tower, let’s hope someone locks ’em in.last_img read more

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Master baking/Chilli, Ginger & Coriander Flatbread

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first_imgby Dan De GustibusMakes 1 loaf (scale up to suit)Ingredients AmountStrong white bread flour 400g/l5oz2 small red chillies (seeded and finely chopped)1 bunch fresh coriander (chopped)Fresh ginger (peeled and grated) 1 tbspDried Easy-bake yeast 7g [1tsp]Warm water 260ml/11fl ozSea salt 6g [1 good tsp]Olive oil for brushing and drizzling 2 tbspTip: Do not use dried spices, they are so inferior to the real thingMethod1. Place all the dry ingredients (plus half the chillies and coriander) into a mixer with a dough hook attached. Mix to a soft dough with the water, turn on to a floured board and knead for 10 minutes.2. Shape the dough into a circle.3. Place on to a greased baking sheet, brush with olive oil and boldly dimple the surface with your fingertips – do not worry about ripping the dough, it will be fine.4. Sprinkle over the remaining chillies and coriander and the ginger and leave to prove until doubled in size. Bake at 190?C/375?F for 25 minutes. Drizzle with olive oil.l Dan De Gustibus is owner of award-winning restaurant business De Gustibus and teaches breadmaking at Raymond Blanc’s Cookery School at Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons.last_img read more

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Jacksons plans growth

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first_imgBaking Industry Awards winner Jacksons The Bakers has opened a new £1.2m bakery, with a view to expanding into new areas, including supermarket supply.The one-shop Chesterfield bakery has targeted expansion of its wholesale business, which currently accounts for two-thirds of its turnover, after scooping the Tesco-sponsored Quality Product Award at BIA08.”We have already had an enquiry to supply a couple of products to Aldi, so we’re going to explore that side of the business,” said owner Trevor Jackson. “It will be more diverse for us, as it will be high volumes – not something we have done before.”The 12,000sq ft facility was built from the ground up and took just six months to complete.l Also see Knowledge Store, pg 42last_img

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Reporting in Sandwich training on the cards

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first_imgWith a surge in sales reported in the last three months, it looks as if the commercial sandwich market will achieve solid growth over the year, contrary to some expectations.So the sandwich industry should be heading for the Lunch! show in October in a reasonably positive mood. This new annual event, supported by the British Sandwich Association (BSA), has every prospect of becoming a showcase for the industry and is expected to attract even more buyers this year than it did in its first year. Taking place at Old Billingsgate Market (October 1 and 2), the event is being used by the BSA as a launchpad for a new package of training programmes for the industry and, to mark the occasion, it is organising a special Training Academy, run at the event, for people coming into the industry. Details can be found at www.lunchshow.co.uk.The BSA has been concerned about the lack of adequate training for sandwich makers and has spent considerable time over the last year developing a suite of online training programmes specifically for the industry. It sees training as a critical factor in improving standards across the sector.The autumn should also see the launch of a new Industry Guide for Sandwich Manufacturing, which is being produced by the BSA along with the Food Standards Agency. The guide is currently out on public consultation and should be finalised in November for publication. Anyone wishing to comment on the consultation will find the guide and a response form at www.sandwich.org.uk/fsa/.last_img read more

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British Society of Baking reveals annual dinner details

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first_imgThe British Society of Baking is to host its exhibition dinner on the Monday night of the [email protected] exhibition, taking place from 25-27 March 2012 at Birmingham’s NEC.The dinner will take place at the Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel and Country Club, near Birmingham’s NEC on 26 March. It is open to anyone visiting or exhibiting at the show, not just Society members. Following the dinner, the guest speaker is Rev Richard Coles, once a member of 1980s pop group The Communards and now a popular BBC radio broadcaster with a prime-time Saturday show.The dinner, including wine, tea and coffee is £70 to BSB members and £75 to non-members. Guests booking a table of 10 can subtract £75 from the total price. Visit www.bsb.org.uk for details, or contact BSB secretary Sharon Byrne at [email protected] or tel 01869 247098.last_img read more

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One person killed in head-on crash in LaPorte County

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first_img Pinterest Facebook One person killed in head-on crash in LaPorte County Pinterest WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Facebook Twitter Previous articleRelease: Elkhart Police will look at mask violations on a case-by-case basisNext articleCass County woman, 79, killed after being struck by golf cart Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ By Jon Zimney – July 25, 2020 0 482 (95.3 MNC) One person was killed in a head-on crash in LaPorte County.The collision happened just before 12 p.m. on Friday, July 24, in the 8200 block of U.S. 6 when a passenger vehicle and a pick-up truck collided.The driver of the passenger vehicle was killed. A two-year-old child in the backseat recveived minor injuries. The driver of the pick-up was taken to Memorial Hospital in South Bend for treatment, according to 95.3 MNC’s reporting partners at ABC 57.Officials believe a semi truck was side-swiped by the pick-up prior to the head-on crash.The driver of the pick-up truck was airlifted to Memorial Hospital for treatment of their injuries.The La Porte County Fatal Alcohol Crash Team is investigating the crash. Twitter WhatsApp Google+last_img read more

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News story: Karen Johnston reappointed as Deputy Pensions Ombudsman

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first_imgGuy Opperman, Minister for Pensions and Financial Inclusion, on behalf of the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, has reappointed Karen Johnston as Deputy Pensions Ombudsman for a further 2 years. Following on from a 3 year term, Karen’s reappointment will start on the 1 July 2018.last_img

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Government response: Russian briefing on Syria chemical weapons use, 21 June 2018: UK response

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first_imgThe Russian MFA’s briefing today on chemical weapons in Syria included unfounded criticisms of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)’s independent and objective investigations in Syria.It is well known that the Syrian regime has a long history of using chemical weapons against its own people. The OPCW-UN Joint Investigative Mechanism was set up by the United Nations Security Council in 2015 to attribute responsibility for chemical attacks in Syria. Russia agreed to the working and investigative methods of the Joint Investigative Mechanism (JIM).The JIM has confirmed the use of chemical weapons in Syria by the Syrian regime on 4 separate occasions. Despite this clear evidence, the international community has been unable to respond due to repeated Russian vetoes at the UNSC.A significant amount of information indicates that the Syrian regime was also responsible for the chemical weapons attack in Douma. An independent OPCW report is due to be published soon.We hope that Russia will constructively cooperate with the OPCW investigation into Douma, rather than disrupt and undermine. Russia has a right to submit any relevant evidence to the OPCW for independent analysis.It is vital all countries work together constructively to ensure the Chemical Weapons Convention is upheld.last_img read more

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Speech: Maintaining peace in the Middle East and North Africa

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first_imgThank you very much Mr President and good to see you in New York again. Thank you to Russia for the opportunity to discuss holistically the situation in the Middle East and North Africa.Mr President, I think we all agree that many of the conflicts in this region share root causes and complex linkages. And we agree that an approach to resolving these conflicts that needs to consider each conflict in isolation will not succeed. They need to be looked at in the round. I think we’re also aware that there are some existentialist struggles between some of the Member States in the region, but not all are aggressive towards their neighbors or commit unfriendly acts towards their neighbours. The MENA region, people have been saying, should perhaps have its own Helsinki Final Act moment. And I don’t want to be prescriptive, but I think something that brings the region together would be very worthwhile considering and we would be happy to join any consideration of that issue.Overall, our understanding of any conflict should be shaped by an analysis that looks at the full breadth of root causes, the role of regional and international actors and the individual history and circumstances of the country. And in return the response of the Security Council and the whole of the UN to these conflicts needs to be holistic.Before I turn to the Russian concept note, Mr President, and our own views, I just wanted to start by endorsing fully what the French Ambassador said about Iran. We will have another opportunity to talk about Iran later this week, so I will expand my remarks then. But I just wanted to pledge the UK’s support to what he said.Mr President, there were many points in the Russian concept note with which we agreed. We agree with you on the devastating humanitarian consequences of the various conflicts in the MENA region. And OCHA’s own figures are truly staggering: 22 million in need of assistance in Yemen, 13 million in Syria, 1.9 million in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and a million in Libya. The humanitarian relief efforts of all Member States, international actors and indeed ordinary citizens, have indeed helped to avert some suffering. But it isn’t enough. And 66 percent of humanitarian appeals, in OCHA’s own figures, have yet to be fulfilled.We have written recently as the United Kingdom to the Secretary-General to set out our own humanitarian contribution to the crises in the Middle East. We continue to see examples of states restricting access to humanitarian agencies and we see attacks by armed groups on humanitarian workers. What justification, Mr President, can there be for these attacks? We agree with you that humanitarian assistance should not be politicised, but as long as these attacks continue, it will be.Conflict has particularly affected religious and ethnic minorities. Yazidi in Syria and Iraq. The Baha’i in Iran in Yemen. Terrorist actors and state institutions in the region have been responsible for some of the worst persecutions in history. So we hope, like you, that the Security Council can unite behind efforts to resolve conflicts peacefully. We should do everything we can as a Security Council to support efforts made by the Secretary-General and his Special Representatives to bring peace to the region; make serious progress in Syria, Yemen and Libya; to use our collective and bilateral efforts to put pressure on those that oppose or undermine these efforts; and ensure that peacekeeping missions are fit for purpose.On the Middle East peace process, Mr President, that a number of speakers have mentioned, we reiterate to our support for the two-state solution, and we look forward to the American proposals which we hope will be able to be issued soon.There are some areas, Mr President, where we do not share your views as set out in the concept note. And wanted to begin this section by saying that I’ve just come from the R2P Debate in the General Assembly, and it strikes me, Mr President, this goes to the heart of many of our disagreements about how to handle these conflicts. Your concept note calls for a commitment to the supremacy of international law and the need for a collective approach to the problems of the region. We can endorse that fully. But where there are cases when populations are injured or persecuted because of the actions of their own governments, that is not only against international human rights law and the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, which every country in this room has pledged to uphold. It is actually risking a precursor to a wider conflict. And if the Security Council and the international community do not take an interest at that early stage, there is a much greater likelihood that the situation gets out of control and a much greater likelihood that there will eventually be conflict, including conflict across borders. Whether or not that is armed incursions, or whether it is sending refugees across borders, and hence, Mr President, ultimately a much greater likelihood, not just that the Security Council will ask to take action, but that it will need to take action in order to address the root causes. So I invite all those countries who do not like the Security Council looking at situations of human rights persecutions in individual countries. I just invite them to see that logical train of where ignoring such events is likely to lead. And if I may, I’d like to quote from the preamble of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that celebrates its 70th year anniversary this year, which says, “It is essential if man is not to be compelled to have recourse as a last resort to rebellion against tyranny and oppression that human rights should be protected by the rule of law.” That’s the reason why we in the United Kingdom believe that human rights is properly relevant to Security Council discussion of any particular international peace and security situation.You say, Mr President, that unilateral action is doomed to failure. For the United Kingdom’s part, like all of the speakers so far, we would like to see the Security Council take collective action. But it is blocked, and where it is not blocked, it is subsequently disregarded. International action cannot solely be a matter for the lowest common denominator. We can look at Syria – and a number of speakers have referred to Syria. We are all aware of the circumstances. The Security Council has been blocked from holding to account those responsible for violating international law. A resolution to refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court was vetoed in 2014. This year a resolution was vetoed that would have allowed the Joint Investigative Mechanism to continue its vital work. The use of chemical weapons, whether by terrorists or state actors, needs to be investigated. Those responsible need to be held to account and the much greater danger we would assert, Mr President, is in letting it be thought that chemical weapons can ever be used as a weapon of war and the international prohibition on their use disregarded.There have been reports over the weekend, furthermore, of air and artillery attacks against the de-escalation area in southwest Syria. These are deeply concerning and the reports appear to point to this Syrian government. A military offensive by the Syrian government would be a flagrant violation of the ceasefire and the de-escalation agreement that Russia has been involved in. We urge everybody with influence on this situation to help uphold the commitments and urge restraint.Mr President, sanctions are a vital part of the Security Council’s arsenal. As Article 41 of the Charter makes clear, they give very real effect to our decisions and they turn our words in this chamber into tangible consequences for those who threaten international peace and security. Sanctions are not our first resort and they are not a measure that we ever take lightly, but we know that they work. They have helped bring peace and security to countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone. They helped bring Iran and DPRK to the negotiating table. And they continue to play a vital role in the fight against Da’esh and Al Qaeda in Iraq, Syria and beyond.Mr President, we believe that there are some further issues that would merit discussion by this Council not covered in your note that could underpin future discussions by the Council on this important subject.We agree with the Secretary-General that political participation in the region remains weak and we agree we need to strengthen democratic institutions. And I’d like to echo his tribute to Tunisia and also endorse his words on the problems caused by retarding economic opportunity. A genuine holistic approach to conflict in the region cannot ignore the issue of good governance.Good governance from strong, stable state institutions is the best way to maintain peace and security. Bad governance can be devastating and we have seen that in a number of countries in the region. When governments violate their citizens human rights, I was saying earlier, we know that the risk of conflict and suffering increases. It is the Council’s responsibility to consider and be informed on all these issues due to their impact on international peace and security. As an international community we must support institutions that uphold the values the United Nations was set up to protect and which worked for the benefit of all citizens.Lastly, Mr President, I would like to say a word about post-conflict reconstruction. Failure to stabilise and reconcile communities after a long conflict will fail to restore peace and security in the long term. It is not a trade-off between peace and justice. The task of the Council is to help the UN and countries themselves find the right way to have both peace and justice. And I think we all know that the role of women can be vital in that endeavour.International actors, including this Council, play a vital role in ensuring limited resources can be distributed effectively in supportive institutions that address the root causes of previous conflicts.Thank you very much Mr. President.last_img read more

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